Tag Archives: video content

What is the value of video use in education?

Matt Goral
Educational Technologist
City, University of London

Media and Learning Conference 2018 – Leuven, Belgium

Video assessment, video quality and lecturer performance

Courtesy of a 2018 UCISA Bursary, I was able to travel to Leuven in Belgium for this year’s Media and Learning Conference.  Among the conference’s discussions and presentations, there were several which explored the nature and purpose of video in education and assessment.
A long discussion ensued on why we might use video assessment, why ask students to make videos. There was a general consensus that the main reason is that digital literacy is becoming more important all the time. Tools to produce video are widely available and just as essay writing asks students to think critically, engage with existing literature, etc., in addition to the actual content, video format asks them to learn new software, think about data and formats, consider storage and sharing, etc. The speciality of video is providing an opportunity to learn the many digital skills in an authentic context.

Due to the variety of formats and styles, using rubrics to mark is very important to achieve consistency. Getting students to submit a storyboard or script beforehand that’s graded is also very useful, to help them with planning as the temptation is just to start shooting, and we all know how important pre-production is.

Jeanine Reutemann from Leiden University talked about quality of video. She mentioned it’s quite a hard thing to talk about, that we like watching some people and not others. Performance in front of camera really matters and is a bit unpredictable. It’s a skill. Also clearly there is a close relationship between someone’s performance and the way we shoot, communicate, and direct them. We should be mindful that the speaker will be influenced and potentially thrown by the setup. Bright lights, microphones, potentially many people hanging around. There is an intensity that doesn’t suit everyone. We should be mindful and consider how we can get the most out of someone’s style.
Also, let’s not put PowerPoint slides into VR.

Conference format

A few words on the organisation of the conference as I found it interesting. There were several formats running in parallel. First, is the familiar presentation with questions at the end. Those were limited to about 20 minutes each which was great for concentration. Secondly, there was a cinema which screened educational movies and projects at several points. Next, were the small workshops which focused on specific pieces of software that let you try them out with an expert. Finally, there were the discussion groups. Those were great in theory as the room was setup in a big circle, and the facilitators encouraged discussions between participants. However there were a few people introduced as “experts” who framed the discussion by talking about a few projects of their own. This changed the focus of the room from an open discussion between peers, to a panel session with unusual sitting. It was a wasted opportunity in my opinion, especially as only one facilitator had an activity planned and the rest of the sessions were unstructured. I see a lot of educational conferences falling back on lectures, and ignoring our own advice and not taking enough risks with formats, activities and approaches.
Overall, I think the conference was great. It allowed many new ideas and successes to be shared, but also allowed us to see that we are struggling with very similar issues (such as lecture capture adoption, see this paper ‘Tune up, tune in, don’t drop out by Emily Nordman et al.).

What next?

Please feel free to leave a comment, or email me (matt.goral@city.ac.uk), about anything that resonated with you.
I would also like to ask if you’d be interested in a webinar where you are able to ask me about the conference in more detail. If so, please leave a short comment, or email me saying you would be interested, and what you would like to talk about.

P.S. The featured picture is a photo of an untitled sculpture by Gregg Louis shown as part of the 2018 Grand Chess Tour which happened to coincide with the conference.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme. 

Copyright issues in HE video use

Matt Goral
Educational Technologist
City, University of London

Media and Learning Conference 2018 – Leuven, Belgium

As a grateful recipient of a UCISA Bursary, I was fortunate enough to travel to Leuven in Belgium for the Media and Learning Conference.
The Media and Learning Conference is jointly organised by the University KU Leuven and the not-for-profit European Media & Learning Association. Around 90% of participants come from academic organisations with contributors coming from a wide range of international organisations. The main themes of this year’s conference were: innovating learning; exploring different video-based formats; scaling up services; improving the effectiveness of video; video as an assessment tool; video-based learning analytics; augmenting video.
These blog posts are a reflection on the presentations and discussions at the conference.  There were a lot of topics, formats, points of view and discussions which makes it difficult to provide a coherent linear narrative, so instead I will discuss a few different topics.

Discussion: Legal and ethical issues affecting video use in higher education
Anna Mazgal and Bartolomeo Meletti

Anna Mazgal from Wikimedia and Bartolomeo Meletti from Learning on Screen, shared their thoughts and advice on dealing with copyright and intellectual property. It’s an intimidating and often ignored topic. Lectures often want black and white answers, but with copyright law the answer is usually ‘it depends’. This means that there is a perception that it’s too complicated and people often avoid the topic entirely, either by refraining from including any copyright material or including it regardless of the law. In reality the law is generally more permissive than we may think, and the many exceptions provide means of including copyrighted material in our lectures, videos, presentations, etc. One useful resource that tried to explain the differences between countries is copyrightexceptions.eu.  It’s worth exploring to get a good overview of what we might be able to use.

Personally, I also wanted to find out if Brexit will have a big impact on this, but Bartolomeo did not think so, which was reassuring. There may be small challenges but overall it’s not likely to change, as many regulations are embedded in UK law already.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Storytelling and video techniques

julie120

Julie Adams
Academic Skills Tutor
Staffordshire University
UCISA DSDG (User Skills Group)

 

 

Learning Technologies 2015: Day 1 – Mark Davies and Gemma Critchley

In the first part of this session film maker Dr. Mark Davies (tweeting as @SeeLearning) covered some of the key issues to consider when creating videos and some of the simple kit we can now use to get started. In the second part, Gemma Critchley (@GemStGem), Online and Informal Learning Product Manager at BP, described how they have used video to support staff development and showed examples of some of the most successful of these.

Mark outlined the three keywords for successful video: relevance, authenticity and expertise. A good story will engage us and give some kind of emotional connection. Especially for online learning where video gives the ‘humanity’ you would normally get in face to face sessions. In my own institution I have found this to be true with staff who deliver totally online courses reporting positive feedback from students when they have included a ‘welcome’ video or even just a narrated PowerPoint.

Steps to create these engaging videos are: find your story; get the right people to tell it; plan well; and connect to other resources. Videos should be short (five minutes max) and don’t need to be overly complicated. Mark had found that what worked best for him was to ‘layer’ content on a page – basically a mix of text, video and other activities. I suspect that most of our staff would already use this approach when including video in Blackboard or Moodle courses.

Most smartphones are now capable of high quality video and with just a few additions such as a compatible mic (such as the Rode Smartlav+ and a tripod, you could have all the kit required for around £200.

One interesting suggestion was the best way to ‘frame’ interviews to look authentic. This is to get the person being recorded positioned in the left or right of the frame, looking across the frame. I had not specifically noticed this before, but looking at any number of videos of people this is definitely the most widely used technique – and certainly used in all the BP videos on YouTube which include interviews.

A final suggestion from Mark was to use music to enhance the emotion – as long as it is not “corporate cheesy”! Suggested sites for this were The Music Bed and iStock audio. The examples Mark used from these sites were certainly a higher quality than some others I have heard, so may be worth exploring if you need music for a video project.

In the second half of the session Gemma described The Hub at BP. This is for performance support and just-in-time learning. It has around 200 videos with a mix of internal, user-generated and externally-curated content. Over half of BP staff used the site in the last year, and the site has developed using feedback from staff via social media and focus groups. She showed an example of a staff member in Brazil who was the first female supervisor that certainly included all the areas Mark discussed – very emotionally engaging, had a real story and used framing and music effectively. Unfortunately I can’t find a link to this within the BP YouTube site.

The Hub certainly sounded an impressive resource for staff and while I think it might be difficult for most HEIs to develop an equivalent for their staff development, I think it could be worth looking at a way to promote free video resources more widely; and the session reminded me that this was something I wanted to look at doing myself.

Learning Technologies 2015