Tag Archives: Video

What is the value of video use in education?

Matt Goral
Educational Technologist
City, University of London

Media and Learning Conference 2018 – Leuven, Belgium

Video assessment, video quality and lecturer performance

Courtesy of a 2018 UCISA Bursary, I was able to travel to Leuven in Belgium for this year’s Media and Learning Conference.  Among the conference’s discussions and presentations, there were several which explored the nature and purpose of video in education and assessment.
A long discussion ensued on why we might use video assessment, why ask students to make videos. There was a general consensus that the main reason is that digital literacy is becoming more important all the time. Tools to produce video are widely available and just as essay writing asks students to think critically, engage with existing literature, etc., in addition to the actual content, video format asks them to learn new software, think about data and formats, consider storage and sharing, etc. The speciality of video is providing an opportunity to learn the many digital skills in an authentic context.

Due to the variety of formats and styles, using rubrics to mark is very important to achieve consistency. Getting students to submit a storyboard or script beforehand that’s graded is also very useful, to help them with planning as the temptation is just to start shooting, and we all know how important pre-production is.

Jeanine Reutemann from Leiden University talked about quality of video. She mentioned it’s quite a hard thing to talk about, that we like watching some people and not others. Performance in front of camera really matters and is a bit unpredictable. It’s a skill. Also clearly there is a close relationship between someone’s performance and the way we shoot, communicate, and direct them. We should be mindful that the speaker will be influenced and potentially thrown by the setup. Bright lights, microphones, potentially many people hanging around. There is an intensity that doesn’t suit everyone. We should be mindful and consider how we can get the most out of someone’s style.
Also, let’s not put PowerPoint slides into VR.

Conference format

A few words on the organisation of the conference as I found it interesting. There were several formats running in parallel. First, is the familiar presentation with questions at the end. Those were limited to about 20 minutes each which was great for concentration. Secondly, there was a cinema which screened educational movies and projects at several points. Next, were the small workshops which focused on specific pieces of software that let you try them out with an expert. Finally, there were the discussion groups. Those were great in theory as the room was setup in a big circle, and the facilitators encouraged discussions between participants. However there were a few people introduced as “experts” who framed the discussion by talking about a few projects of their own. This changed the focus of the room from an open discussion between peers, to a panel session with unusual sitting. It was a wasted opportunity in my opinion, especially as only one facilitator had an activity planned and the rest of the sessions were unstructured. I see a lot of educational conferences falling back on lectures, and ignoring our own advice and not taking enough risks with formats, activities and approaches.
Overall, I think the conference was great. It allowed many new ideas and successes to be shared, but also allowed us to see that we are struggling with very similar issues (such as lecture capture adoption, see this paper ‘Tune up, tune in, don’t drop out by Emily Nordman et al.).

What next?

Please feel free to leave a comment, or email me (matt.goral@city.ac.uk), about anything that resonated with you.
I would also like to ask if you’d be interested in a webinar where you are able to ask me about the conference in more detail. If so, please leave a short comment, or email me saying you would be interested, and what you would like to talk about.

P.S. The featured picture is a photo of an untitled sculpture by Gregg Louis shown as part of the 2018 Grand Chess Tour which happened to coincide with the conference.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme. 

Innovation in HE video use

Matt Goral
Educational Technologist
City, University of London

Media and Learning Conference 2018 – Leuven, Belgium

Virtual reality and 360 video

I was fortunate enough to travel to Leuven in Belgium last month for the Media and Learning Conference, courtesy of a UCISA bursary.  In the course of the conference, there was quite a lot of discussion about virtual reality, augmented reality and 360 video. I highlight two particular projects below.
Kristof Cleymans and Annelies Huysentruyt from Artevelde University College talked about how they used 360 video and multi-camera recordings in nursing courses.
To better prepare student nurses for an upcoming practical exam, they gave them an opportunity to view the simulation room where the assessment will take place ahead of time. They took 360 videos and pictures, and annotated them with Vizor to show things like content of cupboards and available equipment. The feedback was very positive. The examiners really appreciated that students arrived at the examination much better briefed, and they were able to spend time discussing the assessment rather than familiarising students with the rooms.
Kristof and Annelies also worked on recording clinical assessments from multiple angles, specifically for feedback purposes. They were asked for help as that particular year there about three times more students in the cohort to give feedback for. Teachers were worried about the quality of the feedback. The recordings meant they were able to provide feedback to whole groups of students at the same time, and the feedback was much more accurate as they did not have to rely on memory. Additional benefit was that the feedback included a lot more positive observations and praise, rather than just focusing on the mistakes. The setup consisted of a few webcams positioned out of the way around the assessment room.

The second project involved Rob Higson and Matt Howcroft from University of Derby working with a literature lecturer. The lecturer said that first year students are really unprepared for studying poetry and wanted to create a resource that would help her address that. The team produced a 360 video that walks the students through a poem, comprised of many creative pieces of footage. The 360 let the students watch and create their own journey through it, whilst listening to a performance of the poem. Some students were given the opportunity to view it using VR which was received very positively. One important piece of advice said to slow everything down and make the cuts a lot gentler than usual, as it is not clear where the students might be looking at any given moment and sharp changes could disorient them, ruining the experience. To ensure students get the most out of it, the video was preceded with explanations on what to consider whilst watching and how it ties to the theory explored in the module.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Copyright issues in HE video use

Matt Goral
Educational Technologist
City, University of London

Media and Learning Conference 2018 – Leuven, Belgium

As a grateful recipient of a UCISA Bursary, I was fortunate enough to travel to Leuven in Belgium for the Media and Learning Conference.
The Media and Learning Conference is jointly organised by the University KU Leuven and the not-for-profit European Media & Learning Association. Around 90% of participants come from academic organisations with contributors coming from a wide range of international organisations. The main themes of this year’s conference were: innovating learning; exploring different video-based formats; scaling up services; improving the effectiveness of video; video as an assessment tool; video-based learning analytics; augmenting video.
These blog posts are a reflection on the presentations and discussions at the conference.  There were a lot of topics, formats, points of view and discussions which makes it difficult to provide a coherent linear narrative, so instead I will discuss a few different topics.

Discussion: Legal and ethical issues affecting video use in higher education
Anna Mazgal and Bartolomeo Meletti

Anna Mazgal from Wikimedia and Bartolomeo Meletti from Learning on Screen, shared their thoughts and advice on dealing with copyright and intellectual property. It’s an intimidating and often ignored topic. Lectures often want black and white answers, but with copyright law the answer is usually ‘it depends’. This means that there is a perception that it’s too complicated and people often avoid the topic entirely, either by refraining from including any copyright material or including it regardless of the law. In reality the law is generally more permissive than we may think, and the many exceptions provide means of including copyrighted material in our lectures, videos, presentations, etc. One useful resource that tried to explain the differences between countries is copyrightexceptions.eu.  It’s worth exploring to get a good overview of what we might be able to use.

Personally, I also wanted to find out if Brexit will have a big impact on this, but Bartolomeo did not think so, which was reassuring. There may be small challenges but overall it’s not likely to change, as many regulations are embedded in UK law already.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Award winner reflects on the value of a UCISA bursary

Emma Fletcher
Technology Enhanced Learning Advisor
York St John University

 

 

EDUCAUSE 2017 Conference, Philadelphia

Emma Fletcher was funded to attend this event as a 2017 UCISA bursary winner

Receiving a UCISA bursary allowed me to attend the EDUCAUSE annual conference in Philadelphia during November 2017. I believe it has had a number of positive effects on my personal development in higher education, for the directorate I’m a part of, and for colleagues within the university that I work with to support and advise.

Professional development

In terms of benefits to my personal CPD, I chose a number of relevant and useful sessions to attend at the conference. I selected sessions that aligned well with my role (and the University’s foci) to ensure it was a worthwhile experience. Some of the sessions have impacted on my practice at the University, such as the sessions focussing on video and recording academic staff. One of my team’s current projects is the digital transformation of a particular school, which involves recording staff talking about key themes in their modules. I have used some of the suggestions and ideas from the conference to develop these recordings which have been beneficial to the academic staff, along with the students who will be using the videos.

The overall experience and the information I gained from attending Educause has helped me in my own career and I have since applied for a technology enhanced learning (TEL) role at another institution. I used reflections from my time at the conference during the interview process and was successful.

Institution

Prior to attending the conference, the Director of my directorate was extremely positive about my being awarded the bursary and told me that Deputy Vice-Chancellor knew about it and was impressed. After the conference, I was given time during the directorate team meeting to speak about the conference with my colleagues. The team includes our educational developers, who work with academic staff on their teaching and learning. The team showed a real interest in some of the sessions and as a result I have had one to ones with some colleagues within the directorate about the sessions I attended and have shared some of the resources I collected whilst I was there.

I have spoken with my line manager about my experiences at the conference. We discussed the learning spaces and active learning sessions, as the former session was one I was asked to attend. Learning spaces is a particular area of interest, with my line manager overseeing a project at the University involving a redesigned learning space.

I have been able to informally present a number of times to colleagues at the university about some of the sessions I attended that relate to them. Along with the UCISA blogs I produced covering areas such as active learning spaces and universal design for learning (UDL) and learning management systems (LMS), I wrote a separate blog for the University, which highlighted sessions that I thought would be more relevant to the institution such as: learning spaces, universal design for learning and learning management systems, active learning, microlearning and social media, video creation and working with academic staff for technology innovation. When meeting colleagues across the University, I have spoken about the conference or sessions that I feel are relevant to them and hope this has impacted positively on them.

HE IT community

My attendance at the conference has broadened my knowledge and understanding of TEL, particularly from an international context, and allowed me to draw comparisons with the UK sector, and in particular the external factors influencing decisions we make about TEL (for example, Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), apprenticeships etc.). This has impacted on my interaction, for example when speaking with colleagues across the university. I feel more confident in my knowledge of HE and Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) (something which has been a steep learning curve after spending most of my career in secondary education) and I believe colleagues have seen the benefits.

I found the scale and programme of the conference made it difficult to connect with other attendees, however I discovered a lot of great people on Twitter and have developed my personal learning network a great deal. It has been particularly interesting to see TEL in an international context and I hope to cement some of the links I made over time.

Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

New ways of thinking

Emma Fletcher
Technology Enhanced Learning Advisor
York St John University

Highlights of EDUCAUSE 2017

Emma Fletcher was funded to attend this event as a 2017 UCISA bursary winner

As a UCISA bursary award winner, I was able to attend this year’s EDUCAUSE 2017 conference. Some of the highlights included several general sessions as well as break-out sessions and a visit to the exhibition hall.

The general session for the second day of the conference was given by Katherine L Milkman, an expert in behavioral economics, and covered decision biases or choice architecture (which has some similarities with nudge theory). She covered the six principles to promote improved decisions:

  1. Set helpful defaults
  2. Prompt people to plan
  3. Leverage social norms
  4. Create accountability
  5. Capitalise on fresh starts
  6. Allow pre-commitment.

Other highlights from that day included:

The final session of the third day of the conference was the general session “Developing Students who have Different Kinds of Minds” delivered by Temple Grandin, a professor and author, talking about ‘visual thinkers’ and ‘pattern thinkers’. During the presentation, she talked a lot about her own experiences, thoughts and opinions.  She also discussed education at K12 and how children with different minds can struggle especially with fewer opportunities for hands on learning.


 

 

 

 

Overall, I enjoyed the conference experience although it was, at times, overwhelming due to the sheer scale of it. I personally found the breakout sessions more engaging and useful than the general sessions, although I still have FOMO about the parallel sessions I didn’t get to attend! The conference hashtag was full of reflections and discussions during the conference and is a good place to catch up.

  Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Storytelling and video techniques

julie120

Julie Adams
Academic Skills Tutor
Staffordshire University
UCISA DSDG (User Skills Group)

 

 

Learning Technologies 2015: Day 1 – Mark Davies and Gemma Critchley

In the first part of this session film maker Dr. Mark Davies (tweeting as @SeeLearning) covered some of the key issues to consider when creating videos and some of the simple kit we can now use to get started. In the second part, Gemma Critchley (@GemStGem), Online and Informal Learning Product Manager at BP, described how they have used video to support staff development and showed examples of some of the most successful of these.

Mark outlined the three keywords for successful video: relevance, authenticity and expertise. A good story will engage us and give some kind of emotional connection. Especially for online learning where video gives the ‘humanity’ you would normally get in face to face sessions. In my own institution I have found this to be true with staff who deliver totally online courses reporting positive feedback from students when they have included a ‘welcome’ video or even just a narrated PowerPoint.

Steps to create these engaging videos are: find your story; get the right people to tell it; plan well; and connect to other resources. Videos should be short (five minutes max) and don’t need to be overly complicated. Mark had found that what worked best for him was to ‘layer’ content on a page – basically a mix of text, video and other activities. I suspect that most of our staff would already use this approach when including video in Blackboard or Moodle courses.

Most smartphones are now capable of high quality video and with just a few additions such as a compatible mic (such as the Rode Smartlav+ and a tripod, you could have all the kit required for around £200.

One interesting suggestion was the best way to ‘frame’ interviews to look authentic. This is to get the person being recorded positioned in the left or right of the frame, looking across the frame. I had not specifically noticed this before, but looking at any number of videos of people this is definitely the most widely used technique – and certainly used in all the BP videos on YouTube which include interviews.

A final suggestion from Mark was to use music to enhance the emotion – as long as it is not “corporate cheesy”! Suggested sites for this were The Music Bed and iStock audio. The examples Mark used from these sites were certainly a higher quality than some others I have heard, so may be worth exploring if you need music for a video project.

In the second half of the session Gemma described The Hub at BP. This is for performance support and just-in-time learning. It has around 200 videos with a mix of internal, user-generated and externally-curated content. Over half of BP staff used the site in the last year, and the site has developed using feedback from staff via social media and focus groups. She showed an example of a staff member in Brazil who was the first female supervisor that certainly included all the areas Mark discussed – very emotionally engaging, had a real story and used framing and music effectively. Unfortunately I can’t find a link to this within the BP YouTube site.

The Hub certainly sounded an impressive resource for staff and while I think it might be difficult for most HEIs to develop an equivalent for their staff development, I think it could be worth looking at a way to promote free video resources more widely; and the session reminded me that this was something I wanted to look at doing myself.

Learning Technologies 2015

ESNet, The Energy Sciences Network

matt_c

 

Matt Cook
Head of Infrastructure and Middleware
Loughborough University
Chair of UCISA-NG

 


2014 Technology Exchange – Day 3

One of the features of conferences outside of the UK and especially prevalent in the USA is early morning sessions. It was time on day three to hit the 07:15 morning working group/camp/BoF sessions.

Unfortunately the ‘Campus Cloud Architects BoF’ was cancelled, which was really disappointing and not a good start, as I was hopeful to explore in person some of the latest concerns, trends and experiences in this area.

Industry groups have been reporting more and more interest in Cloud brokerage solutions and some companies are now recruiting for cloud broker and cloud architect roles. As cloud technology gets more mature, there is an opportunity to start brokering for the best possible service and cost for your organisation. In the sector we have seen an excellent start in this area by Janet with their agreements with Microsoft and Google for their email/applications suite.

There is a lot of development scope in this area with Microsoft Azure, AWS etc and I’m interested to explore the strategy required to position infrastructure, automation and standards to take best advantage of the emerging competition.

Perhaps this area is something that colleagues in the UCISA IG may be interested in picking up in the future?

I took advantage of the programme changes to share more details about the current UCISA activity in the ad-hoc groups using a short five-slide presentation covering these pieces of work:

• A guide to the implementation of an Information Security Management System (ISMS), launching in early 2015

• An update to the popular  ‘Exploiting and Protecting the Network’ document, launching in early 2015

• The Major Project Governance Assessment Toolkit

• UCISA Report 2013 – Strategic Challenges for IT Services.

There was a lot of interest in these areas and I had a couple of questions about integrating the planning, effort and joint working of UCISA and EDUCAUSE where there are clear overlaps and topics of interest.

The Energy Sciences Network ESnet are also interested in contributing to the Network Performance and QoS ‘community of practice workshop’  which the UCISA Networking Group are planning in January 2015 (more details coming to the UCISA NG mailing list soon).

Data Intensive Science

As an area where I have little experience, I was interested in listening to what William Johnston from ESnet had to say about large-scale data intensive science. He started by explained his view that high energy physics is seen as a prototype platform for distributed collaboration in other science fields.

He explained that as instruments get bigger, they get more expensive (in a not-quite-as-dramatic Moore’s Law relationship); therefore there are less of them which results in an increase in collaboration, globally. This shows the potential future growth of research networking bandwidth requirements.

One of the things I didn’t realise was that ESnet have extended their 100Gb full network backbone across the Atlantic into Europe, including connections in London. Their first circuit is being tested today. What does this mean for science and research in the UK?

Further details are available at:
http://es.net/news-and-publications/esnet-news/2014/esnet-extends-100g-connectivity-across-atlantic
http://www.geant.net/MediaCentreEvents/news/Pages/three-high-speed-links.aspx

William went on to talk about monitoring the network, explaining the criticality of this area. With many Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offerings, researchers are requesting Network as a Service; and with that the same levels of assurance and guarantees that have only previously been available with point to point links; is this going to change?

As one would expect, ESnet use perfSONAR for their assurance measurements. As I mentioned earlier, we will hopefully have representatives from ESnet and eduPERT at our Network Performance and QoS ‘community of practice workshop’ in January 2015.

Would something like perfSONAR deployed across Janet be of benefit for the community, perhaps let us know your thoughts in the blog feedback section below? I would assume it requires volunteer sites; however Janet are already looking at the possibility of network based probes for eduroam, so perhaps there is scope for a next generation of Netsight with added assurance?

ESnet also use the weathermap tool, which is also loved by colleagues at Loughborough University. It was one of the best take away messages from a Janet Networkshop Lightning talk several years ago.

The remainder of the talk was about data transfer speeds and integrity. I was surprised to hear the comment “SCP is your enemy”. Surely not? However I was approaching the problem from the wrong angle, thinking about security and not data transfer speeds and parallelisation. Look at some of the figures in the photograph below.

2014TechExDay3

 

William discussed a number of tools including GridFTP and a development from CALTECH, which stripes data across discs as part of the FTP process as well as providing up to three times CRC checking.

Interestingly the last point was about data integrity, which is critical for the field of data intensive science. William referenced the paper Stone and Partridge, 2000 “When The CRC and TCP Checksum Disagree”.

During the break, I had a bit of a Google to find any UK user or interest groups for Research Computing and HPC. I found the HPC SIG, if you know of any others, please pop them in the blog comments to share.

Connecting 40Gb Hosts

Whilst in the ‘big data’ mindset, there was an interesting session where colleagues from Fermi Labs, ESnet and CALTECH shared best practice infrastructure configuration to support high-speed data transfer.

There was some very interesting visual modelling, which demonstrated the affinity the network card has with a particular processor socket and core. The difference between optimising for data transfer is significant 37Gbps vs 26Gbps max on a 40Gbps link.

It was a packed session with many colleagues standing at the back; there is certainly an art to tweaking infrastructure to perform in the best possible manner. It was also interesting to hear there are three 100Gb network cards in development and testing.

Pushing the Boundaries of the Traditional Classroom

There was a bit of a clash in the programme, so I didn’t get to spend a lot of time in this session, but it was interesting to see what Indiana University had done with their ‘Collaboration Café’.

It led me to wonder what the key limitation of adopting more of these learner centric classroom designs is? Is it financial or is it resistance from academic colleagues in the same way as there was/is resistance to lecture capture and VLE environments?

UCISA are working along with SCHOMS and AUDE on an update to Learning Space design principals. This document should be really useful, especially as the final point from the presentation was all about the removal of wires.

At Loughborough we are trialling the Epson projector series that use the Epson EasyMP software and iProjection App. What wireless projectors and/or screens are you using? Let us know in the blog feedback section below?

Other Thoughts

The other talks I attended through the day continued on the research and big data theme. It included hearing about the PetaBytes (PB) of data required by some of the medical research being undertaken as part of the ICTBioMed platform. One of the speakers commented that biology is becoming more like computer science by the day; confirming again that multidisciplinary research is a firm requirement for a lot of modern applied research.

Some examples of digital biology given were: DNA Sequencing, Gene Expression Analysis, Protein Profiling and Protein to Protein interactions.

A number of the speakers came in via videoconference; it was interesting to see the mix of success and failure of this bold move. It seems strange that we still struggle to co-ordinate a remote video connection with the technology we have at our disposal in 2014.

Another speaker also made reference to the worldwide nature of large research groups and collaborations and said this collaboration technology was essential.

Video Collaboration

For the final session of the day, I was interested to see what the future held for video based collaboration in a session with speakers from: Internet2, Pexip, Evogh, Blue Jeans and Vidyo. I didn’t manage to ask Robb from Blue Jeans more about the removal of the Skype interface API that was so disappointing, however during the panel he mentioned that they had a Google Hangouts bridge to standards based systems available.

There were some interesting remarks from Hakon Dahle who is CTO at Pexip based in Oslo (but was previously CTO at Tandberg and Cisco).

Hakon described their distributed architecture, where it is possible to start small and grow appropriately with options to add capacity on demand in an agile manner.

Latency was still an issue with global video conferencing and there was a panel debate about the pros/cons of transcoding increasing latency vs accessibility and interoperability.

“Transcoding is a necessary evil”; especially with new protocols like WebRTC etc!

There were very positive comments about WebRTC and how it will make video more accessible and will make face to face communications easier; however there is already a divide with Google VP9 protocols being favoured by some players in the market especially when delivering very high resolution 4K streams.

Hakon explained that WebRTC seemed the most promising technology to allow direct person to person video calls and will bring about a lot of new use cases and that the new use case element is the most exciting in terms of innovation.

Learning Points

• How do we best position our infrastructure to take advantage of emerging Cloud competition?
• How do we collaborate more with colleagues from Internet2, ESnet and EDUCAUSE? Is this something UCISA and Janet/Jisc can facilitate?
• Future growth potential of research data transfer requirements
• Are we best serving our research communities, what more can we do?
• Global nature of research and therefore the communication requirements.

Matt Cook