Tag Archives: teaching

What does the digital age mean for teaching and learning?

Alice Gallagher
Senior Product Development Manager
The Open University

OEB 2017: Highlights and reflections

The talks and sessions I attended at OEB 2017, courtesy of a UCISA bursary, were hugely varied, and offered the opportunity to engage with different perspectives to my own. This can be fascinating and enlightening, but also challenging. There were talks that really struck a chord, and others that jarred for me. It can be difficult to reflect back on the latter, to try to understand where that disconnection comes from.
In these blogs, I’ve grouped my thoughts into the keynotes on the first day, some of the highlights, and lowlights, of the rest of the conference and my critical reflections.

Keynotes

Aleks Krotoski – The Tales they are A’Changin

Aleks is a familiar media figure and gave a very engaging and entertaining talk about the nature of storytelling and how it has changed. She moved though subject areas as varied as the Bible, Star Wars and My Little Pony! Essentially, the point she was making (I think), was that stories used to be guarded by gatekeepers, but the rise of the digital age has moved us to the extreme of fanon (fans creating new stories which then become part of the mainstream/canon). This made me think about the shift in power, and the democratisation of the Internet. However, how do you apply that to a learning context? Collaboration and co-design are wonderful democratising concepts in teaching and learning, but isn’t there always the role of a teacher in some capacity? Even if you move away from the traditional ‘imparting of wisdom’ teacher/student dynamic.
One message that came through loud and clear for me was that uncertainty can lead to reinvention. A central theme of the conference and a positive opening message.

Follow-up session (Aleks Krotoski)

I attended a follow-up discussion session with Aleks, which focused on how we might apply storytelling in our own professions. Although I went into the session thinking about how I might be able to use storytelling techniques in developing learning materials for students, it soon became clear to me in the session that the real story I needed to tell was to my academic colleagues. I work in learning innovation, and one of the biggest challenges of my role is explaining what the future of digital learning might be like. By making digital learning the subject of my story, I could use storytelling structural devices to get across my message.
Where was the world before we started?
What is going to change? What are your goals?
Raising the stakes (engagement)
Main event (answers question)
Resolution (world as it is now) – share truth in specifics
Until recently, I couldn’t see how I could use this kind of storytelling in my work. Sometimes you have to conform to familiar language to persuade people to listen, and sometimes you need to break the mould to be heard. It feels like the moment to break the mould might be around the corner. I have been keeping this storytelling structure in my back pocket for just that moment!

Abigail Trafford – Longevity learning technology

Abigail gave a fascinating talk about learning in later life. This is not an unfamiliar notion to me. At the Open University we traditionally cater for students in all walks of life. However, what I hadn’t really considered were the different needs of older people in preparing for the future. Abigail talked about the emergence of adolescence, and its role in helping young people prepare for adult life. As life expectancy increases we are seeing a new stage of life appear. That new stage comes after the tasks of adulthood are complete, but before old age. New, healthy decades in the middle of life that people need help in transitioning into. How can we help them develop new skills, prepare for their next career? How can we innovate in part-time, flexible study to cater for the needs of this age group?
I have recently been involved in some research with students into learning behaviours. One of the outcomes of this work is the dispelling of the notion of ‘digital natives’. Digital capability when it comes to learning seems to have no correlation to age. We looked at behaviours around digital preference and technological self-efficacy, and found a pattern in the behaviours of those new to HE and those with more experience, has nothing to do with age. The more we understand about students’ capabilities and needs, and the less we stereotype, the more we can innovate and help everyone fulfil their potential, at whatever stage of life they are.

 

Pasi Sahlberg – Myths and facts about the future of schooling

I really enjoyed Pasi’s talk. He is clearly a very skilled teacher and was able to entertain, inform and educate a huge room full of delegates very skilfully. His talk focused in on the OECD study of the education policies of different countries. From his Finnish perspective, he commented on the features of successful and not-so-successful education policies. As you might have guessed, Finland has been coming out on top! It was fascinating to compare the features of the education policies of Finland and England. Practical and research evidence shows the approach of Finland and others like it works better, not just in academic performance, but also health and well-being.
Finland England
Cooperation Competition (between schools)
Risk-taking and creativity Standardisation
Professionalism De-professionalisation of teaching
Trust-based responsibility Test-based accountability
Equitable public education for all Market-based privatisation
My reflections on this talk were perhaps more personal than the others. I have one child at school and another about to start. My daughter has just taken her first SATS, aged seven. I distinctly dislike the approach to education forced on schools in England: the testing, the focus on mental arithmetic and spelling. Although I support their schoolwork, at home we focus on creativity, problem-solving, reading for fun, emotional intelligence. I was so pleased to hear I was not alone in this approach, and to keep going, despite ‘traditional values’ government policies.
Videos of the conference can be found here including the Keynote presentations.
Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Innovation in HE video use

Matt Goral
Educational Technologist
City, University of London

Media and Learning Conference 2018 – Leuven, Belgium

Virtual reality and 360 video

I was fortunate enough to travel to Leuven in Belgium last month for the Media and Learning Conference, courtesy of a UCISA bursary.  In the course of the conference, there was quite a lot of discussion about virtual reality, augmented reality and 360 video. I highlight two particular projects below.
Kristof Cleymans and Annelies Huysentruyt from Artevelde University College talked about how they used 360 video and multi-camera recordings in nursing courses.
To better prepare student nurses for an upcoming practical exam, they gave them an opportunity to view the simulation room where the assessment will take place ahead of time. They took 360 videos and pictures, and annotated them with Vizor to show things like content of cupboards and available equipment. The feedback was very positive. The examiners really appreciated that students arrived at the examination much better briefed, and they were able to spend time discussing the assessment rather than familiarising students with the rooms.
Kristof and Annelies also worked on recording clinical assessments from multiple angles, specifically for feedback purposes. They were asked for help as that particular year there about three times more students in the cohort to give feedback for. Teachers were worried about the quality of the feedback. The recordings meant they were able to provide feedback to whole groups of students at the same time, and the feedback was much more accurate as they did not have to rely on memory. Additional benefit was that the feedback included a lot more positive observations and praise, rather than just focusing on the mistakes. The setup consisted of a few webcams positioned out of the way around the assessment room.

The second project involved Rob Higson and Matt Howcroft from University of Derby working with a literature lecturer. The lecturer said that first year students are really unprepared for studying poetry and wanted to create a resource that would help her address that. The team produced a 360 video that walks the students through a poem, comprised of many creative pieces of footage. The 360 let the students watch and create their own journey through it, whilst listening to a performance of the poem. Some students were given the opportunity to view it using VR which was received very positively. One important piece of advice said to slow everything down and make the cuts a lot gentler than usual, as it is not clear where the students might be looking at any given moment and sharp changes could disorient them, ruining the experience. To ensure students get the most out of it, the video was preceded with explanations on what to consider whilst watching and how it ties to the theory explored in the module.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Copyright issues in HE video use

Matt Goral
Educational Technologist
City, University of London

Media and Learning Conference 2018 – Leuven, Belgium

As a grateful recipient of a UCISA Bursary, I was fortunate enough to travel to Leuven in Belgium for the Media and Learning Conference.
The Media and Learning Conference is jointly organised by the University KU Leuven and the not-for-profit European Media & Learning Association. Around 90% of participants come from academic organisations with contributors coming from a wide range of international organisations. The main themes of this year’s conference were: innovating learning; exploring different video-based formats; scaling up services; improving the effectiveness of video; video as an assessment tool; video-based learning analytics; augmenting video.
These blog posts are a reflection on the presentations and discussions at the conference.  There were a lot of topics, formats, points of view and discussions which makes it difficult to provide a coherent linear narrative, so instead I will discuss a few different topics.

Discussion: Legal and ethical issues affecting video use in higher education
Anna Mazgal and Bartolomeo Meletti

Anna Mazgal from Wikimedia and Bartolomeo Meletti from Learning on Screen, shared their thoughts and advice on dealing with copyright and intellectual property. It’s an intimidating and often ignored topic. Lectures often want black and white answers, but with copyright law the answer is usually ‘it depends’. This means that there is a perception that it’s too complicated and people often avoid the topic entirely, either by refraining from including any copyright material or including it regardless of the law. In reality the law is generally more permissive than we may think, and the many exceptions provide means of including copyrighted material in our lectures, videos, presentations, etc. One useful resource that tried to explain the differences between countries is copyrightexceptions.eu.  It’s worth exploring to get a good overview of what we might be able to use.

Personally, I also wanted to find out if Brexit will have a big impact on this, but Bartolomeo did not think so, which was reassuring. There may be small challenges but overall it’s not likely to change, as many regulations are embedded in UK law already.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

UCISA bursary – one of the most rewarding experiences of my career

Ben Sleeman
Service Development Assistant
University of Greenwich

AETM Conference 2017 and university visits, Melbourne, Australia

Attending the Audiovisual and Education Technology Management Conference (AETM) in Australia, made possible by a bursary from UCISA, was one of the most rewarding experiences of my career to date.

Learning from peers

USICSA’s bursary scheme has supported the development of my career by giving me exposure to a conference where the other delegates have management responsibilities for audio visual technologies and the development of AV in teaching and learning spaces. This was a great opportunity to meet and network with AV teams from across Australia and with AETM members attending the conference from New Zealand.
The support from UCISA also gave me the opportunity to see how AV and IT technology is being converged to make effective and efficient use of technology in education outside of the UK.
During the trip and since my return I have shared my university visits and AETM conference experience via social media (Facebook and Twitter), the UCISA blog , via photos, 360º VR photos and interviews with members of the AV teams at each of the universities I visited. This information has been shared with others within higher and further education, including the UCISA community – for example, I am in touch with another bursary winner interested in AV developments, Ed Stout – as well as members of AETM in Australia. My UCISA blog posts have been shared via internal communications at the University of Greenwich. I have also shared the information about the social media pages I have been blogging to with my team and the first and second line teams at the university.

Insight into implementation of AV

The first week’s visits to five universities gave me an insight into how AV is implemented in Australia. The universities I visited were: Deakin University, Monash University, RMIT, Swinburne University and the University of Melbourne.
The differences in AV implementation ranged from which manufacturers had been used (some of which was due to geographical location and distribution), through to the remote equipment monitoring systems and the development of AV systems (in some cases, using universities’ own IT/AV teams and converging their skill sets). It was also interesting to see the mix of support models in use, with AV supported by internal teams in some institutions and by external companies in others.

AV projects

The AETM conference gave me yet more exposure to AV projects that have been undertaken and how they are managed in universities across Australia and New Zealand, as well as presentations from AV manufacturers. The conference also included presentations and tours around the teaching and learning spaces of the host university, the University of the Sunshine Coast, to show case their AV installations. This included a tour of the CAVE2TM, which provides a near-seamless 320-degree, immersive and panoramic 3D virtual environment, USC Nursing, Paramedic, House Simulation clinics and Law Moot court.

IP solutions

Of particular interest from a personal development point of view was that IP (internet protocol) based solutions are either being trialled or have been established at all the universities that I visited: IP solutions for wireless BYOD, audio over IP via AES67 for lecture capture, AV over IP to replace tradition HDBaseT and assistive hearing technologies over Wi-Fi. They seemed to be ahead of UK institutes, however I have seen this to be more and more the case in the UK from visits to other institutes and round table events, where AV over IP has been discussed as well as the development of AV IP technologies showcased at Integrated Systems Europe show (ISE).

Next steps

With this in mind, I am hoping to improve my knowledge of network infrastructures to help think about AV projects from both an AV and IT/IP point of view. The bursary has given me the opportunity to see how the AV world is moving further into the IT world and has influenced my decision to investigate the possibility of applying for a place on a Master’s Degree course in Computer Systems and Network Engineering.
Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Interview: How Deakin University caters for BYOD and wireless collaboration

Ben Sleeman
Service Development Assistant
University of Greenwich

AETM Conference and university visits, Melbourne, Australia

 

In this final blog covering the AETM Conference Australia and a series of interviews with Jeremy West, Senior Audio Visual Engineer and Tech Lead in the eSolution Team, Deakin University, I talk to Jeremy about BYOD provision at Deakin and how they are looking at solutions to allow students to interact in lectures via BYOD. Jeremy also talks about the extensive wireless collaboration across the university’s estate.


In my series of interviews with Jeremy, we discussed a wide range of AV areas including:

A big thank you to Jeremy and the team at Deakin University for showing me around their estate and giving me the opportunity to see how their AV solutions work currently and with an eye to the future supported by the eSolutions team.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

UCISA welcomes blog contributions and comment responses to blog posts from all members. If you would like to contribute a new perspective or opinion on a current topic of interest, simply contact UCISA’s marketing manager Manjit Ghattaura via manjit.ghattaura@it.ox.ac.uk

 

The views expressed on UCISA blogs are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of UCISA

Interview: Lecture capture at Deakin University and the Echo solution

Ben Sleeman
Service Development Assistant
University of Greenwich

AETM Conference and university visits, Melbourne, Australia

During my visit to a number of Melbourne universities in November, I carried out a series of interviews with Jeremy West, Senior Audio Visual Engineer and Tech Lead in the eSolution Team at Deakin University. Alongside attending the AETM Conference, the trip allowed me to visit not only Deakin University but Monash University, RMIT, Swinburne University and the University of Melbourne to explore further their AV solutions.

In this penultimate interview of the series, Jeremy talks about the lecture capture solutions at Deakin University including streaming of lectures, the use of tracking cameras and source switching. He also discusses how much of the teaching and learning spaces are covered by the Echo solution they have in place.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

UCISA welcomes blog contributions and comment responses to blog posts from all members. If you would like to contribute a new perspective or opinion on a current topic of interest, simply contact UCISA’s marketing manager Manjit Ghattaura via manjit.ghattaura@it.ox.ac.uk

 

The views expressed on UCISA blogs are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of UCISA

Interview: How Deakin University is working towards an excellent user experience

Ben Sleeman
Service Development Assistant
University of Greenwich

AETM Conference 2017 and university visits, Melbourne, Australia

Ben Sleeman was funded to attend this event as a 2017 UCISA bursary winner
As part of my series of interviews with Jeremy West, Senior Audio Visual Engineer and Tech Lead in the eSolution Team at Deakin University, we discussed the support structures and teams in place at the university in terms of AV support. In this interview, Jeremy outlines the teams involved in the running of the AV systems, how problem resolution is managed, and how the different teams are working together to lead to an excellent user experience.

Other areas I discussed with Jeremy in separate interviews included:
I will be blogging further about my conversations with Jeremy on other AV developments at Deakin.
Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.
UCISA welcomes blog contributions and comment responses to blog posts from all members. If you would like to contribute a new perspective or opinion on a current topic of interest, simply contact UCISA’s marketing manager Manjit Ghattaura via manjit.ghattaura@it.ox.ac.uk

 

The views expressed on UCISA blogs are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of UCISA

Interview: Digital signage solutions and content management at Deakin University

Ben Sleeman
Service Development Assistant
University of Greenwich

AETM Conference 2017 and university visits, Melbourne, Australia

Ben Sleeman was funded to attend this event as a 2017 UCISA bursary winner
As part of my trip to Australia to attend the AETM Conference, I was able to visit Deakin University. In this interview with Jeremy West, Senior Audo Visual Engineer and Tech Lead, eSolution Team, at Deakin, I discuss the university’s digital signage solutions. Jeremy outlines how the signage is managed across the university from a content and integration point of view.

Below are the other areas we discussed during my visit:
Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.
UCISA welcomes blog contributions and comment responses to blog posts from all members. If you would like to contribute a new perspective or opinion on a current topic of interest, simply contact UCISA’s marketing manager Manjit Ghattaura via manjit.ghattaura@it.ox.ac.uk

 

The views expressed on UCISA blogs are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of UCISA

Interviews: How AV developments in Melbourne’s universities are helping students

Ben Sleeman
Service Development Assistant
University of Greenwich

AETM Conference 2017 and university visits, Melbourne, Australia

Prior to attending the Audiovisual and Education Technology Management (AETM) Conference (AETM conference) at the University of the Sunshine Coast, courtesy of a UCISA bursary, I spent a week visiting five universities in Melbourne.  At each of the universities, I was taken on a tour of their teaching and learning spaces by the audio visual teams, and then interviewed a member of the team at each university to talk about what I had seen.

I have already shared interviews with Jeremy West, Senior Audio Visual Engineer and Tech Lead in the eSolution Team at Deakin University, where we discussed the range of AV technologies at Deakin and these can be seen in my previous blog posts. One of the particular areas we discussed related to the support of hearing impaired users in teaching and learning spaces – this was also an area that I discussed with other university AV teams when touring their facilities.

Monash University

The first university I visited was Monash University where I met Matt Crawford, Audio Visual Operations and Service Delivery Manager in the eSolutions Team. Matt showed me around the teaching and learning spaces and answered some questions about what I saw on the tour.

We also talked about the current hearing-impaired AV solutions at Monash University and about new technologies and the legal requirements in Australian buildings to acquire a certificate of occupancy. Currently, Monash have various technologies, such as hearing loops and infra-red (IR), in place due to the age of their buildings but they are aiming to move to a consolidated solution.

University of Melbourne

The second tour of teaching and learning spaces took place at The University of Melbourne. Here Carlo Sgro, Senior Technical Specialist in Audio Visual Service and Strategy Infrastructure Services, gave me a tour and discussed the university’s AV solutions.

When talking about hearing impaired AV solutions, Carlo said that a high proportion of the systems are hearing loops; they have tried to stay away from infra-red and radio frequency (RF) solutions so are currently investigating wifi solutions as an alternative.

RMIT

The third university visit was with RMIT. I was taken around RMIT’s teaching and learning spaces by Adam Attana, Team Lead, AV Design, Technology – Learning, Teaching and Research, and Nikesh Kapadia, AV Delivery Manager, Information Technology Services.  After the tour I interviewed Nikesh, who explained how the flat floor teaching spaces have the IR systems in place while the lecture theatres have induction loops. With the IR systems, the receivers are managed by the student facing RMIT connect department, which allows the receivers to be lent out to students with hearing impairments.


 

 

Swinburne University

My fourth visit was to Swinburne University where I met with Robert Cameron, Technical Manager – Audio-Visual, Infrastructure Group, Information Technology. Most of the hearing-impaired solutions at Swinburne have historically been induction loops but they have recently moved to IR solutions.



Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

UCISA welcomes blog contributions and comment responses to blog posts from all members. If you would like to contribute a new perspective or opinion on a current topic of interest, simply contact UCISA’s marketing manager Manjit Ghattaura via manjit.ghattaura@it.ox.ac.uk

 

The views expressed on UCISA blogs are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of UCISA

Expanding horizons with a UCISA bursary

Beccy Dresden
Senior TEL Designer
The Open University

 

 

 

DigPedLab Vancouver 2017

Beccy Dresden was funded to attend this event as a 2017 UCISA bursary winner

HE TEL/IT community

Probably the biggest and most lasting benefit of receiving a UCISA bursary has been the impact that participating in DigPedLab Vancouver has had on me feeling part of a worldwide HE Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL)/IT community: my Twitter timeline now has a decidedly international flavour! The Literacies track included nearly 30 participants – two Brits apart from me, a professor from Puerto Rico, an educator based in the Austrian Alps, and the rest from North America, a mix of librarians, academics, educational project managers, IT folk, and even a practising attorney. This diversity was one of the many things that made DigPedLab so attractive to me: I wanted my western European, middle-class, middle-aged, cis white female perspective to be thoroughly challenged; over the course of the weekend, it certainly was. Each track had a dedicated Slack channel, and many of the participants have generously shared their own digital literacies resources via that medium, which I in turn have been able to share with Open University (OU) colleagues and, where those resources were publicly accessible, with the wider community (e.g. via links in my bursary blog posts). And of course the bursary also gave me an opportunity to share my work and that of my team/institution with the North American (and wider) HE TEL/IT community, an international visibility that would otherwise be difficult to achieve.

Institutional impact

While there have been fewer institutional opportunities than I had hoped to disseminate what I learned at DigPedLab Vancouver (they have mainly been restricted to knowledge-sharing activities within my team, and colleagues in our Learning and Teaching Innovation Portfolio), one exciting benefit to come out of it is that I am currently supporting faculty colleagues to deliver our own mini DigPedLab here at the OU. Having experienced their teaching first hand, I am a strong advocate for the critical digital pedagogy approach promoted by Jesse Stommel, Sean Michael Morris, and their associates, and I am looking forward to developing a network of support for this approach across my institution.

Since this year’s bursary scheme was launched I have been actively encouraging other OU staff to apply for it – by promoting it via email and other internal communication channels, and putting up posters across the campus.

Personal/professional development

I remain connected to many of the DigPedLab participants via Twitter, and the time difference between the UK and the US means my day often starts by reading their posts and following their links. Participating in such a challenging (but supportive) ‘summer school’ with innovative and inspiring practitioners has really boosted my confidence in what I have to offer around digital literacies as a TEL professional, as well as dramatically increasing my understanding of the challenges faced by my peers in North American HE institutions. My horizons could not have been expanded in this way without the opportunity provided by the UCISA bursary, which is why I have a tweet encouraging others to apply for it pinned to my Twitter profile.

Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.