Tag Archives: story-telling

Creativity at Business Analysis Europe

Rachel Drinkwater
Senior Business Analyst
Coventry University

The Business Analysis Conference Europe 2018

Last month I had the opportunity to attend the much lauded Business Analysis Europe Conference in Westminster, London, courtesy of UCISA’s annual personal development bursary for those working in the education sector.
Following on from my post about convergence, this article briefly looks at the second of the themes which were prevalent throughout the Business Analysis Europe Conference 2018.

Creativity

Perhaps due to the paradigm shift towards convergence, we may now be working with a different, more creative type of stakeholders: marketers, brand specialists and brand designers and within the technical fields, UX designers and app developers. Perhaps because of a focus on our customers and their journeys and experiences with our systems or the trend towards story-telling, we have a need to be more visionary in our approach to our roles as BAs. Perhaps it is a mix of the above, but it certainly seemed that exploring creative and innovative ways of eliciting requirements, solutionising and design thinking were rife across the sessions.
This was particularly illustrated in the Gamestorming session led by The Home Office’s Amy Morrell and Business Analyst Hub’s Rohela Raouf, in which delegates created concepts for systems solutions to case study problems using Lego, Playdoh and assorted craft materials. The working groups then went on to create a pitch for a branded box which represented the final system as a physical product. Whilst this was quite an extreme use of creativity for identifying areas for improvement and eliciting requirements and one that may require caution before unleashing upon more traditional business stakeholders, it certainly encouraged different, innovative and creative ways of approaching the problem. It was also an excellent opening session to energise the conference delegates and break some of the metaphorical ice!
In addition to these creative approaches, creativity in leadership, in stakeholder management and employing innovative mind-sets to disrupt your organisation and industry were discussed at length. Certainly today’s big players such as Amazon, Google, Uber and Facebook, enjoy their success in part due to the creative approach and innovative mind-set that they have applied to the industry in which they want to operate and in doing so have identified ways to exploit and disrupt the existing industry and its market environment.

Coming Soon…

In addition to convergence and creativity, the following concepts arose time and again at Business Analysis Europe 2018, being discussed and explored in the majority of the sessions I attended:
  • Customer focus
  • Empathy
  • Continuous Learning
  • Catastrophizing.
I will be posting about each one of these at a high level, then looking to explore some of these areas in more detail in future articles.
This blog was originally published at: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/business-analysis-conference-europe-2018-creativity-rachel-drinkwater/
Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Storytelling and video techniques

julie120

Julie Adams
Academic Skills Tutor
Staffordshire University
UCISA DSDG (User Skills Group)

 

 

Learning Technologies 2015: Day 1 – Mark Davies and Gemma Critchley

In the first part of this session film maker Dr. Mark Davies (tweeting as @SeeLearning) covered some of the key issues to consider when creating videos and some of the simple kit we can now use to get started. In the second part, Gemma Critchley (@GemStGem), Online and Informal Learning Product Manager at BP, described how they have used video to support staff development and showed examples of some of the most successful of these.

Mark outlined the three keywords for successful video: relevance, authenticity and expertise. A good story will engage us and give some kind of emotional connection. Especially for online learning where video gives the ‘humanity’ you would normally get in face to face sessions. In my own institution I have found this to be true with staff who deliver totally online courses reporting positive feedback from students when they have included a ‘welcome’ video or even just a narrated PowerPoint.

Steps to create these engaging videos are: find your story; get the right people to tell it; plan well; and connect to other resources. Videos should be short (five minutes max) and don’t need to be overly complicated. Mark had found that what worked best for him was to ‘layer’ content on a page – basically a mix of text, video and other activities. I suspect that most of our staff would already use this approach when including video in Blackboard or Moodle courses.

Most smartphones are now capable of high quality video and with just a few additions such as a compatible mic (such as the Rode Smartlav+ and a tripod, you could have all the kit required for around £200.

One interesting suggestion was the best way to ‘frame’ interviews to look authentic. This is to get the person being recorded positioned in the left or right of the frame, looking across the frame. I had not specifically noticed this before, but looking at any number of videos of people this is definitely the most widely used technique – and certainly used in all the BP videos on YouTube which include interviews.

A final suggestion from Mark was to use music to enhance the emotion – as long as it is not “corporate cheesy”! Suggested sites for this were The Music Bed and iStock audio. The examples Mark used from these sites were certainly a higher quality than some others I have heard, so may be worth exploring if you need music for a video project.

In the second half of the session Gemma described The Hub at BP. This is for performance support and just-in-time learning. It has around 200 videos with a mix of internal, user-generated and externally-curated content. Over half of BP staff used the site in the last year, and the site has developed using feedback from staff via social media and focus groups. She showed an example of a staff member in Brazil who was the first female supervisor that certainly included all the areas Mark discussed – very emotionally engaging, had a real story and used framing and music effectively. Unfortunately I can’t find a link to this within the BP YouTube site.

The Hub certainly sounded an impressive resource for staff and while I think it might be difficult for most HEIs to develop an equivalent for their staff development, I think it could be worth looking at a way to promote free video resources more widely; and the session reminded me that this was something I wanted to look at doing myself.

Learning Technologies 2015