Tag Archives: Sharepoint

SharePoint migration from MySites to OneDrive for Business

Tristian O’Brien
SharePoint Technical Specialist
University of Brighton

Blog entry syndicated from my other blog that runs on GHOST.

I maintain a set of PowerShell scripts and processes to migrate many MySites from SharePoint 2010 to OneDrive for business.

As we know, PowerShell can automate many processes that you could perform using the user interfaces of SharePoint on premise or in the cloud.

So the general idea is to:

  • use a mapping file, where we have at least two columns. Column A in the windows on-premise username. Column B is the Office 365 (O365) login. I do have a third column, which is the destination OneDrive, but since this is almost usually the OneDrive logon, where any ‘@’ or ‘.’ are escaped as ‘_’
  • populate this file or database table with the users that you want to migrate
  • using PowerShell iterate through this list and
  • set users on-premise MySite to read only – I upload a separate master page and change the page status for this
  • in O365, assume the user is setup, licensed and provisioned. We use an account that has global admin rights in O365.
  • in O365, make sure that the global admin has access to the users OneDrive by adding it as a secondary admin
  • use ShareGate PowerShell to migrate the data. I know this is a cheat, but there are many reasons to use ShareGate such as insane mode, using Azure Storage and logging. Here are some other thoughts on Azure Storage.
  • when content has migrated successfully, timestamp the user profile on-premise with a date migrated value – later on we deploy some timer jobs to with delete or recycle after a specified time period.

Take a sneak peek at the https://github.com/devacuk/UoBMigration.  This is some code that I prepared for the dev.ac.uk event co-hosted by UCISA and JISC in February 2018. Slides are available here.  Much of the knowledge I accrued in order to do this are as a result of being awarded a UCISA bursary that paid the costs of travel, conference entrance fee and accommodation to MicroSoft IGNITE 2017.  For blogs on Microsoft Ignite, click here

I strongly suggest that if you do work in IT for a UK Higher Education institution, that you apply for the bursary yourself. Where this particularly helped is that I attended sessions about the latest developments in PowerShell, the tooling and Office 365. I found it particularly valuable to meets engineers from Microsoft Azure, ShareGate, MetaLogix and other vendors of migration products.

The only downside is that it is a corporate event, so one particular query about how and when any throttling of content into and out of Office 365 may occur, didn’t really get any answers from Microsoft, as I guess this kind of detail is a trade secret, I get that.

ShareGate offered some good advice on their experience with organisations way bigger than my institution, in that if you use their tools to manually migrate, use different tabs for different migration tasks. If using it in its PowerShell guise, then split the job up. Although managing that particular task would be a challenge in terms of organisation. I guess you could containerise the server using say Docker but ShareGate licenses would be needed for those individual containers I guess.

Another aspect of IGNITE is the sheer scale if it. I had planned to attend various sessions, but this wasn’t always possible due to sessions being placed far apart, overcrowding at some times and the warm weather. If I went again, I would be prepared for that though.

This blog post also appears on http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/tristianobrien/

Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

UCISA welcomes blog contributions and comment responses to blog posts from all members. If you would like to contribute a new perspective or opinion on a current topic of interest, simply contact UCISA’s marketing manager Manjit Ghattaura via manjit.ghattaura@it.ox.ac.uk

 

The views expressed on UCISA blogs are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of UCISA

Microsoft Teams and Collaboration

Tristian O’Brien
SharePoint Technical Specialist
University of Brighton

Day 2 of Microsoft IGNITE 2017 in Orlando

Tristian O’Brien was funded to attend this event as a 2017 UCISA bursary winner

Day One of Microsoft IGNITE 2017 was all about orientation both personally and within the strategy of Microsoft. Yesterday, we saw some keynotes around AI, machine learning, augmented reality and the importance of social graphs.

More related to my specialism is collaboration in the Office, so I attended a keynote around the Microsoft Teams product. During the keynote, some announcements were made and use cases shown.  An interesting interview on its rollout at Accenture and another large organisation.  The demo of Microsoft Teams showed a compelling product enabling collaboration in the workplace for staff including external folk.  A controversial statement around its design rationale was that it was aimed at millennials who work in a different way – I would have stayed away from such a statement.

One of the challenges of a conference of this size is that it is difficult to co-ordinate going from session to session as there might be a long walk.  I have decided not to necessarily stick to sessions around my specialisms, but to broaden.  I am about to go into a deeper dive session around teams “Collaborate in a chat based workplace using Microsoft Teams“.

Later yesterday in an evening session, Benjamin Niaulin discussed the various classification of collaboration products and we saw that Microsoft Teams is a different use case from “classic” SharePoint (your bread and butter team sites etc.) and Modern SharePoint.  It’s more like a workplace Facebook messenger, an evolution of Skype for business.  I took a picture of a compelling slide, but due to the sheer busyness of the event, some of is content is hidden.

In the photograph, we see five classes of Microsoft collaboration products classified by Benjamin Niaulin of ShareGate: Conversations, where Teams sits, Meetings, Site & File, where SharePoint sits, Task Management and Others such as OneNote and Power BI.  A useful diagram in my opinion.

Click on photo to expand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This blog post first appeared on http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/tristianobrien/

Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Preparation for Microsoft IGNITE

Tristian O’Brien
SharePoint Technical Specialist
University of Brighton

Tristian O’Brien was funded to attend this event as a 2017 UCISA bursary winner

I have been lucky enough to be awarded a bursary for travel and costs for travel and costs for Microsoft IGNITE courtesy of UCISA.  Moreover, I have been invited to sessions to contribute to the roadmap of SharePoint and OneDrive.

I have asked colleagues at the University of Brighton on their views and thoughts.  A couple of significant questions we’d like some insight on are:

  • anecdotally, we have heard that there is 16GB upload limit per Office365 tenancy.  Is that right? How does that work with “business as usual” traffic?
  • there are some great new “templates” in SharePoint Online, such as Planner, Groups and Teams.  Unlike common or garden site collections, we cannot see these as site collections in the usual way in the SharePoint admin area.  How can an organisation manage and govern such sites?  Additionally, it would be great if we could set the default to be private during creation.  Yet we understand that these templates have been conceived to please the majority.

Another thought: through observation of users OneDrive and the rationale of setting these so that only the user can see files?  In a script that I wrote to migrate SharePoint MySites to OneDrive, I had to explicitly and the SharePoint Admin as a secondary admin.  This is so that we can access their files in order that we can provide governance and support of the content.  Out of curiosity, why can’t an admin do that by default?

Planner screenshot

 

 

 

 

 

This blog first appeared on http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/tristianobrien/

Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Digital transformation – dare to dream!

Sara Somerville

 

 

Sara Somerville
Information Solutions Manager
University of Glasgow

 

Day 1 of the AIIM 2016 conference

The introductory workshop with Thornton May provided discussion points for a smaller group of attendees, to get us thinking about what transformation really meant.

Thornton believes transformation has three elements:

  • Trends
  • Wild cards
  • Dreams

Many executives are ‘gee whiz nexties’ and spend a lot of time thinking about the next new shiny bright piece of technology; but where are the dreams and innovations? We are living in an information environment, so basically, information professionals should rule!

The opening keynote from the president of AIIM, John Mancini,  reflected on the twenty years John has been with AIIM. Technology and the information landscape have changed immeasurably since 1996. Back then, the iPhone was still eleven years away; there was no Google, no Twitter, no Wikipedia. And these changes are just a shadow of the change that is to come, and John advised that  we need to exercise humility when we consider the future and what it might hold for technology.

There are three main disrupters accelerating at a pace that could not have been predicted:

However, what distinguishes organisations in an information age is the difference in mindset between those which function in the mainstream and those which function on the edge.

If you compare the two with regard to the following themes, you can see how this manifests:

  • Mindsets – those on the edge will do things themselves, where those in the mainstream will contact IT
  • Messages – on the edge organisations are using Slack whilst mainstream organisations use SharePoint; and those on the edge emphasize innovation whilst the mainstream aims for efficiency
  • Money (where it’s being spent) – on the edge, in the last five to ten years, the big IT players have created wealth equivalent to the GDP of Korea!
  • Machines (what technology is being used) – on the edge they use the Cloud whilst mainstream use servers on premise; on the edge it’s mobile, versus PC for the mainstream; those on the edge configure and connect, while the mainstream build and develop.

The problems created by all this radical disruption can be broadly split in to three areas: automation, security and governance, and insight. Information professionals can make a real difference in all three of these areas:

  • Automation – information professionals can help to identify and automate business processes
  • Security and governance – they can help organisations secure and manage information
  • Insight – they can obtain value from big data and analytics.

AIIM has always believed that information management is about people, process and technology – the technology might change in the future, but the people and process will remain constant.

People_process_tech_blog_2_image1People_process_tech_blog_2_image2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, who now owns the big picture? Who provides the ‘adult supervision’ for all of this? Who acts as the bridge between people, process and technology?  According to John, the information professional should be the glue – now is not the time to stick your head in the sand; now is the time to ‘own this’!

Key takeaway:  We are entering an information renaissance and each and every one of us is a Michelangelo!

Looking beyond the present

The opening keynote was followed by a panel discussion entitled Industry Insights 2020 Expert Panel: Consumerization + Simplification = Digital Transformation, chaired by futurist Thornton May with Andrea Chiappe, David Calderia, Hugo Palacios, and Stephen Ludlow.

The panelists discussed questions around what organisations are concerned with when they talk about digital transformation. It was agreed that it’s not just about taking the paper out of a process, but about using a whole new approach, and thinking about changing your business model. Information professionals should think about what they are not seeing at the moment (e.g. people using Slack). We should also be aware of self-selecting by taking the traditional technological approach.

For a lot of companies the worry is that their competitors will be the ones to smash through and use the latest technologies, leaving them behind. Where is the big spending? In Business Intelligence (BI), and in determining the best use of analytics. However, it’s no good having secure information if it isn’t available at the right time.

Key takeaway: There is a new world that requires a completely new approach and new ways of thinking.

Pan-European implementation

We then broke for the last sessions, and I attended the session entitled Implementing Automated Retention at the European Central Bank with Beatriz Garcia Garrido and Maria Luisa Di Biagio.

The bank uses the Open Text system, which they began implementing in 2007. There are now eighteen thousand users (not only ECB but counterparts across Europe) and eight million documents.

Why implement retention?

  • to keep only what is needed
  • for historical reasons
  • to comply with legislation

The bank ran a pilot to validate the approach, and to test the processes of managing the information. The pilot highlighted that it was complex to build a retention schedule and apply it to the right information at the right level ; so, they took a step back and focused on the final goal of applying retention in the simplest way. They created a task force made up of records managers, archivists, and some Open Text consultants. The task force re-examined the retention schedules and looked at how difficult it was to apply them in an electronic world (the schedules were originally designed for paper records, which made them very difficult to apply).

The schedules were analysed and simplified, rolling up some of the timescales (e.g. one year/five years/ten years/permanent), and adding information about each record series in order to define event-based or time-based triggers only. The system was also tweaked to make it simpler.

During the implementation phase the retention policies were applied at the folder levels, and deletion reports were sent to the business users for approval. Documents were automatically declared as records two years after their creation (if they hadn’t been manually declared as records).

There is a mixture of user-driven and automated retention application. Time-based retention is applied at document level and event based retention is applied at folder level.

Roles and responsibilities : project board; project manager – for each business area there is an implementation team that includes a business user as well as a records manager and an archivist. (Implemented over Jan 2015-Dec 2016.)

As you can see from the slide below, implementation has planned phases.

Implementation_blog_2_image3

The communication channels for the project include the executive board, senior management, the users, and the information management forum for each area.

For the full implementation phase, the team plans to replace sent deletion reports to the business areas with a yearly review of the retention periods within those areas. Future challenges include the preservation of records with long term retention (this is being scoped as a separate project), and other content not in the Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS), e.g. emails.

Key takeaway: The integration of policy, systems, and processes is essential.