Tag Archives: Research

Planning to get the most out of FORCE2018

Alice Gibson
Research Publications Officer
Library & Archives Service
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Preparations for attending FORCE2018

With under a week until I set off, I am greatly looking forward to attending FORCE2018 in Montreal as a UCISA bursary winner for 2018.
FORCE2018 is organised by FORCE11, a community of scholars, librarians, archivists, publishers and research funders that has arisen organically to help facilitate the change toward improved knowledge creation and sharing. Working individually and collectively, their aim is to bring about a change in modern scholarly communication through the effective use of information technology, and to maximise efficiency and accessibility to the communication.
I will be attending pre-conference workshops on 10th October hosted at Concordia University, including participating in Springer Nature’s roundtable discussion, to discuss metrics for open access books. From 10th – 12th October, I will be at McGill University attending sessions and presenting a poster.

Engagement

The theme of FORCE2018 is ‘engagement’, so as an attendee I wanted to set myself the task of organising an event on my return, where I can utilise the new knowledge and skills I hope to acquire while the event is fresh in my memory. The fruits of this labour will be an event for LSHTM’s extended open access week (#LSHTMopenaccessweek), running through October: our ‘Creative Commons Workshop’.
LSHTM’s Creative Commons Workshop’ builds on a blog post ‘Creative Commons outside of Academia’ that in turn expands on the poster that I will be presenting during the poster sessions at FORCE2018. My poster takes up the theme of ‘engagement’ and merges this with the intricacies of open access policies, specifically those concerning what licences scholarly works should be made available under. In doing this, I seek to suggest that encouraging active participation with projects that utilise Creative Commons licences outside of academic life can serve to demonstrate the purpose of some of the licences required within in it.

My Schedule

There are a wide range of sessions available across the three days and having been through the programme, I have already planned which ones to attend.
Of course, as a PhD student studying Philosophy and working in research support, I could not miss the opportunity to attend a talk concerning using Wittgenstein’s thought to consider how we can appeal to theory to help us overcome some of the challenges we face in scholarly communication, an event which will be happening in the morning on Thursday.
I am also particularly looking forward to attending the session run by the cofounders of Impactstory, Heather Piwowar and Jason Priem, on Friday. Their Simple Query Tool has made tasks that would be endless if done manually, straightforward and manageable in my daily role, and filled the void left by the closure of Lantern, the service that Cottage Labs ran to facilitate checking the open access status of articles.
The entire conference is full of fantastic opportunities to address my professional and personal interests and I expect some other highlights to be the workshop on blockchain in scholarly communication, the talk on open access journals in Latin America, and the workshop run by Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer concerning envisaging optimal workflows.
Between all of these sessions, talks and workshops, I hope to have the opportunity to meet with some people who I have come across already in my work in open access, and to meet new colleagues and learn of innovative projects and initiatives to bring back to our team at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. As a note-making mechanism, I will record ideas and resources that I come across throughout the conference on the online tool, Padlet, which will be available for anyone to read here.
On a more personal note, I am very excited to explore the city having never been to Montreal (or Canada) before, and intend to make the most of the wonderful opportunity made available to me.
Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

The importance of an international view of humanities digital content

Sarah Ames
Library Learning Services Support Officer
University of Edinburgh

DHC2018 part 1: some key themes

I was fortunate to receive bursary funding this year from UCISA to attend DHC2018 (Digital Humanities Congress – not to be mistaken with the 16th International Symposium on District Heating and Cooling, which tops the Google results). DHC is a biennial conference organised by The Digital Humanities Institute at the University of Sheffield, exploring digital humanities research, as well as its implications for the cultural heritage sector and IT support services.
In this first blog post, I’m going to list the key themes raised at the conference and in my next post, I’ll summarise some of the papers that I found particularly interesting.

Digitisation

This one isn’t new: without digitised content (and digitised content at scale), libraries’ DH offerings begin to fall short. While, in some academic libraries, DH tools and skills will become a key focus, ultimately, without making available collections, content, or data to interest researchers, partnerships with digital projects becomes problematic.

Data

One paper (Bob Shoemaker’s ‘Lessons from the Digital Panopticon’) discussed a project bringing together 50 datasets to trace the lives of individuals convicted at the Old Bailey; another drew together 4 different library datasets, to investigate the provenance of manuscripts; many others reflected on similar experiences. As libraries look to release collections as data, considering the most appropriate and accessible formats for these will be important. The need to bring together a mix of data types, formats and models, and often ‘bespoke’ formats, complying with no particular standard, is a barrier to research, requiring technical skills that most don’t have.

Global DH

A number of papers raised the issue of the ease of slipping into a Western-focused digital humanities, to the detriment of the field itself. With web and programming languages written largely in English, the focus of research, and particularly of text analysis, has been predominantly English-language. With papers focusing on Asia and Australasia, the global view of DH produces plenty to learn from – with much for libraries to consider, particularly in the relationship between libraries and DH in other cultures and countries.

Sustainability

A repeated issue raised in talks was the sustainability of DH projects going forwards – particularly in relation to web platforms. How are these projects to be maintained post-project completion, and who is responsible for this? What kind of documentation, languages and platforms can be used to assist with, and standardise, this? Is a website an output or a transient resource? How can library and IT services support this?

Funding

Of course, a major part of sustainability is funding: funding models need to meet the cost of web resources over time; not maintain their current short-term focus. The possibilities of crowdfunding to enable ongoing access to tools were raised, but ultimately this remains too fragile a source to rely on.

Digital preservation

With these exciting new platforms and tools becoming part of research outputs, the challenge of how to preserve them becomes ever more pertinent. Unusual data formats; new, innovative research using AR; and the function, importance and relevance of the front end of a website, in comparison to the data it surfaces, are all issues and challenges that need to be considered by libraries.

Publishers

Gale launched their new DH tool, sitting on top of their platforms, enabling researchers to analyse their content at scale without the use or in-depth knowledge of manual computational methods. Although raising issues of ease of use – while this is important to increase accessibility, an understanding of what the tools are doing under the surface remains important, particularly in relation to built-in biases – the platform looked good, and is currently in its early stages. However, this emphasises just how much work libraries have on their hands. With both the content and the tools increasingly in the domain of publishers, there’s a lot of catching up to do.
This blog first appeared in the University of Edinburgh’s Library & University Collections blog.
Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Plate spinning and other things: Your assistance is urgently requested!

plate spinningMy life has a tendency to feel like I’m balancing a series of plates on sticks, and day to day I run between each plate to keep it from falling off its peg. Generally if I work hard and smart enough they all stay up, and I go to sleep congratulating myself on a well-planned, organised and successful day. However some days, and usually more than I would like to admit to, I have to make a choice over which plates are going to hit the floor, and those that get to stay up. And in reality it’s down to luck if one breaks or one bounces. It is however always about my choice over which to prioritise and which to let slip.

One of my big plates spinning this month is the research phase of my PhD, and I’m asking you all for your help in order to keep this plate spinning for the time being. Featured below is a very short survey which I would ask you to:

1. Fill in if relevant
2. Pass on to any relevant managers

http://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/sonya-campbell/providing-converged-services-in-higher-education/

The survey will be out for next 2 weeks, after which I am hoping to start organising a small number of interviews with institutions that would like to participate in the follow up research.

This is moving toward the culmination of a 4 year part-time Professional Doctorate. I would firmly recommend doctoral study to anyone thinking about further development. However, I would firmly recommend learning the art of Plate Spinning prior to commencement to ensure other aspects of life and work can continue!

Post by Sonya Campbell
Customer Services Development Manager
Glasgow Caledonian University

photo credit: IMGP1962 via photopin (license)

ESNet, The Energy Sciences Network

matt_c

 

Matt Cook
Head of Infrastructure and Middleware
Loughborough University
Chair of UCISA-NG

 


2014 Technology Exchange – Day 3

One of the features of conferences outside of the UK and especially prevalent in the USA is early morning sessions. It was time on day three to hit the 07:15 morning working group/camp/BoF sessions.

Unfortunately the ‘Campus Cloud Architects BoF’ was cancelled, which was really disappointing and not a good start, as I was hopeful to explore in person some of the latest concerns, trends and experiences in this area.

Industry groups have been reporting more and more interest in Cloud brokerage solutions and some companies are now recruiting for cloud broker and cloud architect roles. As cloud technology gets more mature, there is an opportunity to start brokering for the best possible service and cost for your organisation. In the sector we have seen an excellent start in this area by Janet with their agreements with Microsoft and Google for their email/applications suite.

There is a lot of development scope in this area with Microsoft Azure, AWS etc and I’m interested to explore the strategy required to position infrastructure, automation and standards to take best advantage of the emerging competition.

Perhaps this area is something that colleagues in the UCISA IG may be interested in picking up in the future?

I took advantage of the programme changes to share more details about the current UCISA activity in the ad-hoc groups using a short five-slide presentation covering these pieces of work:

• A guide to the implementation of an Information Security Management System (ISMS), launching in early 2015

• An update to the popular  ‘Exploiting and Protecting the Network’ document, launching in early 2015

• The Major Project Governance Assessment Toolkit

• UCISA Report 2013 – Strategic Challenges for IT Services.

There was a lot of interest in these areas and I had a couple of questions about integrating the planning, effort and joint working of UCISA and EDUCAUSE where there are clear overlaps and topics of interest.

The Energy Sciences Network ESnet are also interested in contributing to the Network Performance and QoS ‘community of practice workshop’  which the UCISA Networking Group are planning in January 2015 (more details coming to the UCISA NG mailing list soon).

Data Intensive Science

As an area where I have little experience, I was interested in listening to what William Johnston from ESnet had to say about large-scale data intensive science. He started by explained his view that high energy physics is seen as a prototype platform for distributed collaboration in other science fields.

He explained that as instruments get bigger, they get more expensive (in a not-quite-as-dramatic Moore’s Law relationship); therefore there are less of them which results in an increase in collaboration, globally. This shows the potential future growth of research networking bandwidth requirements.

One of the things I didn’t realise was that ESnet have extended their 100Gb full network backbone across the Atlantic into Europe, including connections in London. Their first circuit is being tested today. What does this mean for science and research in the UK?

Further details are available at:
http://es.net/news-and-publications/esnet-news/2014/esnet-extends-100g-connectivity-across-atlantic
http://www.geant.net/MediaCentreEvents/news/Pages/three-high-speed-links.aspx

William went on to talk about monitoring the network, explaining the criticality of this area. With many Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offerings, researchers are requesting Network as a Service; and with that the same levels of assurance and guarantees that have only previously been available with point to point links; is this going to change?

As one would expect, ESnet use perfSONAR for their assurance measurements. As I mentioned earlier, we will hopefully have representatives from ESnet and eduPERT at our Network Performance and QoS ‘community of practice workshop’ in January 2015.

Would something like perfSONAR deployed across Janet be of benefit for the community, perhaps let us know your thoughts in the blog feedback section below? I would assume it requires volunteer sites; however Janet are already looking at the possibility of network based probes for eduroam, so perhaps there is scope for a next generation of Netsight with added assurance?

ESnet also use the weathermap tool, which is also loved by colleagues at Loughborough University. It was one of the best take away messages from a Janet Networkshop Lightning talk several years ago.

The remainder of the talk was about data transfer speeds and integrity. I was surprised to hear the comment “SCP is your enemy”. Surely not? However I was approaching the problem from the wrong angle, thinking about security and not data transfer speeds and parallelisation. Look at some of the figures in the photograph below.

2014TechExDay3

 

William discussed a number of tools including GridFTP and a development from CALTECH, which stripes data across discs as part of the FTP process as well as providing up to three times CRC checking.

Interestingly the last point was about data integrity, which is critical for the field of data intensive science. William referenced the paper Stone and Partridge, 2000 “When The CRC and TCP Checksum Disagree”.

During the break, I had a bit of a Google to find any UK user or interest groups for Research Computing and HPC. I found the HPC SIG, if you know of any others, please pop them in the blog comments to share.

Connecting 40Gb Hosts

Whilst in the ‘big data’ mindset, there was an interesting session where colleagues from Fermi Labs, ESnet and CALTECH shared best practice infrastructure configuration to support high-speed data transfer.

There was some very interesting visual modelling, which demonstrated the affinity the network card has with a particular processor socket and core. The difference between optimising for data transfer is significant 37Gbps vs 26Gbps max on a 40Gbps link.

It was a packed session with many colleagues standing at the back; there is certainly an art to tweaking infrastructure to perform in the best possible manner. It was also interesting to hear there are three 100Gb network cards in development and testing.

Pushing the Boundaries of the Traditional Classroom

There was a bit of a clash in the programme, so I didn’t get to spend a lot of time in this session, but it was interesting to see what Indiana University had done with their ‘Collaboration Café’.

It led me to wonder what the key limitation of adopting more of these learner centric classroom designs is? Is it financial or is it resistance from academic colleagues in the same way as there was/is resistance to lecture capture and VLE environments?

UCISA are working along with SCHOMS and AUDE on an update to Learning Space design principals. This document should be really useful, especially as the final point from the presentation was all about the removal of wires.

At Loughborough we are trialling the Epson projector series that use the Epson EasyMP software and iProjection App. What wireless projectors and/or screens are you using? Let us know in the blog feedback section below?

Other Thoughts

The other talks I attended through the day continued on the research and big data theme. It included hearing about the PetaBytes (PB) of data required by some of the medical research being undertaken as part of the ICTBioMed platform. One of the speakers commented that biology is becoming more like computer science by the day; confirming again that multidisciplinary research is a firm requirement for a lot of modern applied research.

Some examples of digital biology given were: DNA Sequencing, Gene Expression Analysis, Protein Profiling and Protein to Protein interactions.

A number of the speakers came in via videoconference; it was interesting to see the mix of success and failure of this bold move. It seems strange that we still struggle to co-ordinate a remote video connection with the technology we have at our disposal in 2014.

Another speaker also made reference to the worldwide nature of large research groups and collaborations and said this collaboration technology was essential.

Video Collaboration

For the final session of the day, I was interested to see what the future held for video based collaboration in a session with speakers from: Internet2, Pexip, Evogh, Blue Jeans and Vidyo. I didn’t manage to ask Robb from Blue Jeans more about the removal of the Skype interface API that was so disappointing, however during the panel he mentioned that they had a Google Hangouts bridge to standards based systems available.

There were some interesting remarks from Hakon Dahle who is CTO at Pexip based in Oslo (but was previously CTO at Tandberg and Cisco).

Hakon described their distributed architecture, where it is possible to start small and grow appropriately with options to add capacity on demand in an agile manner.

Latency was still an issue with global video conferencing and there was a panel debate about the pros/cons of transcoding increasing latency vs accessibility and interoperability.

“Transcoding is a necessary evil”; especially with new protocols like WebRTC etc!

There were very positive comments about WebRTC and how it will make video more accessible and will make face to face communications easier; however there is already a divide with Google VP9 protocols being favoured by some players in the market especially when delivering very high resolution 4K streams.

Hakon explained that WebRTC seemed the most promising technology to allow direct person to person video calls and will bring about a lot of new use cases and that the new use case element is the most exciting in terms of innovation.

Learning Points

• How do we best position our infrastructure to take advantage of emerging Cloud competition?
• How do we collaborate more with colleagues from Internet2, ESnet and EDUCAUSE? Is this something UCISA and Janet/Jisc can facilitate?
• Future growth potential of research data transfer requirements
• Are we best serving our research communities, what more can we do?
• Global nature of research and therefore the communication requirements.

Matt Cook

2014 Technology Exchange – Day 2 by Matt Cook

matt_c

 

Matt Cook
Head of Infrastructure and Middleware
Loughborough University
Chair of UCISA-NG

 

FIRST Robotics Competition

The Monday evening welcome reception included a contest based on robots developed by high school students. The students were given six weeks to raise funds, design, develop, brand and program a robot – not an easy task! It was great to see such innovation from our students and colleagues of the future. I wish we had these opportunities back when I was at school; the best we experienced was BigTrak and writing Logo programs. However at least we were taught programming in BBC Basic, and not simply how to use the Microsoft Office suite.

2014TechExDay2

The USA is promoting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects in a similar manner to the UK. It will be interesting to see how successful this initiative is in providing the education required for our fellow colleagues of the future and plugging the current skills gap. Talking to the students, they are extremely enthused about the creator, maker, hacker opportunities being given through these programmes.

This is another one of those opportunities which demonstrates the value in the jobs we perform in our respective organisations to support education. I recently undertook a job shadow of a technician in one of our academic schools at Loughborough, and it was one of the most eye opening experiences I had all year.  It was extremely valuable to see the challenges they face within the school, how central IT policy affects their work and the innovation and creative ideas being developed by their students. I would certainly encourage everyone to get out into the wider university more to put everything into perspective.

Central IT vs Research Perspective on Information Security

There was a very interesting panel discussion mid-way through the Tuesday schedule investigating the challenges faced by both the central IT function and research centres in managing Information Security. Rob Stanfield from Purdue University provided an overview of the provision at his organisation and one thing that stood out was the scale of some of the US based education organisations that dwarfed most of the largest UK universities. The scale of operation also brought increased scale of both staffing, and following a coffee break discussion, of budget too. Purdue are currently recruiting a Security Risk Analyst and see an important element of their future service to be able to be better placed to advise on Information Security impact across their business.

There is a growing move to work with researchers to define strategy that allows Information Security to be an enabler and an active component in winning research grants. The panel all agreed that there was a need to form better relationships between research and central IT; something that I’ll personally be working on at Loughborough University over the coming years. There was an agreement that the era of silo’d departmental research email servers and wireless networks was not effective and the future is centralisation and collaboration. Closing comments focused on “…there is nothing like a good data breach to bring about change!” and “…some people are more concerned with IDS appliances than the balance of risk.”

Over coffee a number of people who attended the session were interested in the current UCISA activities to develop an Information Security Management System (ISMS) implementation guide and the update to the popular ‘Exploiting and Protecting the Network’ document; both set to launch in early 2015. Keep an eye on the UCISA website for more information!

As suggested, I will be posting details about these activities to the EDUCAUSE Security Constituent Group mailing list as well. This list may also be of interest to UK colleagues who are looking to get a wider perspective on Information Security concerns within global education organisations. Whilst the remit for security falls between both the Network (NG) and Infrastructure (IG) groups within UCISA, some readers of the blog may not be aware of the UCISA-IS Information Security mailing list. Although currently low traffic, it is a growing area of discussion.

For those with larger security teams, it may also be of interest to explore the TERENA TF-CSIRT group.

Privacy in Access and Identity Management

Dr Rhys Smith (Janet) delivered the final session I attended on Tuesday. I’ve not personally been involved in the Access and Identity Management (AIM) side of IT at Loughborough; however I was eager to see what was on the horizon for Moonshot, especially what it can offer the research community. It was nice to see some friendly faces: Rhys Smith, John Chapman and Rob Evans from Janet; and Nicole Harris from TERENA when I arrived at the conference; I’ve also since met quite a few people I’ve spoken to by email before or have seen posting on mailing lists from.

Rhys gave a gentle introduction to AIM before describing how we should be adopting privacy by design, as it is so difficult to retrofit. As part of a privacy vs utility discussion; Rhys provided the example that the routing of IP network packets outside of the EU is breaking EU data protection guidelines as an IP address is deemed to contain personally identifiable information. Whilst this example is simply unworkable, the categorisation of IP addresses has caused some interesting consequences for our Computer Science researchers.

Following a narrative of the difference between web based federation (SAML) and network based federations (like eduroam); Rhys outlined the timescales for the Moonshot trial and official service. Being able to unify many technologies from simple SSH through to Windows desktop authentication opens many possibilities for secure research collaboration in the future.

Other Thoughts

There were lots of interesting conversations through the conference today about the development of common shared tools or building blocks to solve future challenges. From the infrastructure that supports eduroam through to the Kuali HE software suite. Many felt that through collaboration, a better solution can be developed with less resource; however there were concerns that high workloads in recent years had removed a lot of these opportunities for some.

Another common theme was the adoption of standards, rather than closed proprietary technology, avoiding vendor lock-in where possible and using the infrastructure as a live research aid for students within our organisations.

Learning Points

• Get out into the wider university to put your role into perspective;
• Turn Information Security policy and strategy into an enabler that wins research grants;
• Seek collaboration and closer relationships with our research community;
• Explore opportunities for privacy by design;
• Keep a watching brief on Janet Moonshot developments;
• Support the development of common shared tools and building blocks where appropriate.

Matt Cook