Tag Archives: Padlet

Planning to get the most out of FORCE2018

Alice Gibson
Research Publications Officer
Library & Archives Service
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Preparations for attending FORCE2018

With under a week until I set off, I am greatly looking forward to attending FORCE2018 in Montreal as a UCISA bursary winner for 2018.
FORCE2018 is organised by FORCE11, a community of scholars, librarians, archivists, publishers and research funders that has arisen organically to help facilitate the change toward improved knowledge creation and sharing. Working individually and collectively, their aim is to bring about a change in modern scholarly communication through the effective use of information technology, and to maximise efficiency and accessibility to the communication.
I will be attending pre-conference workshops on 10th October hosted at Concordia University, including participating in Springer Nature’s roundtable discussion, to discuss metrics for open access books. From 10th – 12th October, I will be at McGill University attending sessions and presenting a poster.

Engagement

The theme of FORCE2018 is ‘engagement’, so as an attendee I wanted to set myself the task of organising an event on my return, where I can utilise the new knowledge and skills I hope to acquire while the event is fresh in my memory. The fruits of this labour will be an event for LSHTM’s extended open access week (#LSHTMopenaccessweek), running through October: our ‘Creative Commons Workshop’.
LSHTM’s Creative Commons Workshop’ builds on a blog post ‘Creative Commons outside of Academia’ that in turn expands on the poster that I will be presenting during the poster sessions at FORCE2018. My poster takes up the theme of ‘engagement’ and merges this with the intricacies of open access policies, specifically those concerning what licences scholarly works should be made available under. In doing this, I seek to suggest that encouraging active participation with projects that utilise Creative Commons licences outside of academic life can serve to demonstrate the purpose of some of the licences required within in it.

My Schedule

There are a wide range of sessions available across the three days and having been through the programme, I have already planned which ones to attend.
Of course, as a PhD student studying Philosophy and working in research support, I could not miss the opportunity to attend a talk concerning using Wittgenstein’s thought to consider how we can appeal to theory to help us overcome some of the challenges we face in scholarly communication, an event which will be happening in the morning on Thursday.
I am also particularly looking forward to attending the session run by the cofounders of Impactstory, Heather Piwowar and Jason Priem, on Friday. Their Simple Query Tool has made tasks that would be endless if done manually, straightforward and manageable in my daily role, and filled the void left by the closure of Lantern, the service that Cottage Labs ran to facilitate checking the open access status of articles.
The entire conference is full of fantastic opportunities to address my professional and personal interests and I expect some other highlights to be the workshop on blockchain in scholarly communication, the talk on open access journals in Latin America, and the workshop run by Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer concerning envisaging optimal workflows.
Between all of these sessions, talks and workshops, I hope to have the opportunity to meet with some people who I have come across already in my work in open access, and to meet new colleagues and learn of innovative projects and initiatives to bring back to our team at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. As a note-making mechanism, I will record ideas and resources that I come across throughout the conference on the online tool, Padlet, which will be available for anyone to read here.
On a more personal note, I am very excited to explore the city having never been to Montreal (or Canada) before, and intend to make the most of the wonderful opportunity made available to me.
Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

UCISA bursary leads to new role

Kathryn Woodroof
Business Analyst
University of York

 

 

 

Lessons from the IRM UK Business Analysis Conference Europe 2017

In September 2017, I received a UCISA bursary which enabled me to attend the annual Business Analysis Conference Europe. This conference brings together over 500 Business Analysts from a range of sectors across the continent. At that time I was one year into my first formal BA post and I was excited about an opportunity to fine tune my practice and learn from others. I came back to work with a Padlet board full of conference notes, photos, ideas and contacts. Six months later I’ve been reflecting on the benefits of receiving a UCISA bursary.
For me as an individual, I came away from the conference with a sense of pride in my profession and confidence in the skills and strengths that I can bring to any IT project. I have used new tools and techniques that I learned at the conference, such as systems thinking and prototyping. I’ve also been following my manifesto for fun at work, which I spoke about in my UCISA blog post. Ultimately, the conference motivated me to aim higher and in March 2018, I was appointed to the post of Portfolio Manager for Enterprise Systems. This new role gives me the opportunity to leverage my business analysis skills to facilitate strategic decision-making at the University.
My learning from the conference has also been shared with my immediate team and it’s enabled us to improve our BA practice. We now meet fortnightly to share knowledge and work together on problems. In particular, we’ve been focusing on how we can support agile development practices; this was a hot topic at the conference and the discussions I had with other BAs have informed our thinking here at the University. I’ve also worked with my team to improve the Business Analysis section of our project toolkit, which is a shared resource open to everyone at the University.
I’ve shared my insight from the conference with others outside of our team, for example in a presentation at YO10, our community of practice for staff interested in business change. I’ve also used my conference learning to support Sarah Peace in preparing for a workshop on IT communications with the UCISA Support Services Group.
I also presented my conference takeaways at the Higher Education Business Analyst Forum in London so that my peers in HE could benefit from my experience. I’m still in touch with some of the BAs that I met at the conference via LinkedIn and Twitter and feel that I have a bigger network to tap into than I did before the conference.
Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.
UCISA welcomes blog contributions and comment responses to blog posts from all members. If you would like to contribute a new perspective or opinion on a current topic of interest, simply contact UCISA’s marketing manager Manjit Ghattaura via manjit.ghattaura@it.ox.ac.uk

 

The views expressed on UCISA blogs are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of UCISA

Guided social learning

julie120Julie Adams
Academic Skills Tutor
Staffordshire University
UCISA DSDG (User Skills Group)

 

 

Learning Technologies 2015: Day 2 – Collaborative learning for the networked age

Jane Hart from the Centre for Learning and Performance Technologies led the most interactive of all the sessions I attended. She began by getting us to work with our neighbours by sharing useful apps/resources from our mobile devices. We then moved on to look at QR codes – scanning some Jane provided us with, then creating our own and uploading them to a hashtag (#gslqr). Finally Jane displayed the stream of these on screen allowing us to explore some of those created. In the final exercise, Jane set up a Padlet for us to add comments to, on how we could use these tools or guided social learning in our organisations.

I have to admit to being surprised that the delegates I was sitting by were not at all familiar with QR codes, having never scanned one before let alone thought of creating one. I have used QR codes quite a lot previously, so was able to help them with this. I was also one of the few who had used Padlet before. Maybe in HE we are ahead of some organisations in using these types of tools to support learning.

I think that getting us to co-operate, share and help one another was part of the point of the exercise, rather than showing us the tools themselves, as Jane went on to talk about some of her work in helping teams develop skills and confidence in using technologies through the use of a learning guide. She outlined a project she had worked on with a team of trainers from Pfizer in India who wanted to know more about using iPads in training.

The key features that helped make this a successful social learning course were that participants were quick to comment on each other’s work, congratulated others on their achievements and helped and supported each other with problems. There was also a continuous flow of conversation.

Jane has written more about this training on her blog –  and the manager of the group, Sunder Ramachandran, has also written about his experiences.

A few relevant things to note from what Jane said:

  • An activity itself does not equal learning – we need a goal. This is an obvious point, but worth keeping in mind when introducing new technologies.
  • Sometimes there is a temptation to use tools/technology just because they ‘are there’, rather than because they are the best thing for that particular job.
  • Other success factors for social learning include respect for others’ views, the group wanting to learn and having a learning champion to help encourage and keep learners on track.

I know there have been a number of staff development courses run in HE that follow a similar theme to this, and encourage staff to learn more about social media – especially the variations on ‘23 Things’ that started in libraries but spread to other staff groups too. Although setting up such courses does take some planning and commitment, most people who participate find them beneficial. I have looked at running something along the lines of ‘23 Things’ previously, but never actually done it. This session make me seriously think of trying to get this done – maybe at a scaled-down version looking at a few key technologies and tools.

Learning Technologies 2015