Tag Archives: Learning analytics

Key themes at Educause

Richard Goodman
Learning Technology Team Manager
Loughborough University

Educause 2018 – Day Two

So Day Two of the main Educause conference and it feels like it’s been going for a lot longer after Wednesday’s Day One, and events on Tuesday too.
Another 7:30am “braindate” kicked things off, and then the opening session in the big Bellco Theatre at 8am on AI.
In the blink of an eye, it’s 9:45am and the parallel sessions are up and running again. As the holder of an ITIL Foundation Certificate in IT Service Management (quite a mouthful), I was interested to attend the IT Service Management session, to see where other institutions are at on their ITIL journey. Lots of people (including me) stood up to share plans, stories, issues and achievements in this area. It’s fair to say that a lot of people are adapting ITIL to fit with their processes in order to try and get the best out of it. No-one really seems to be using it “off the shelf”.
Unfortunately, the end of that session clashed with the start of some of the next sessions, so there were around 12 parallel sessions that were then not available. That did leave time for another braindate, this time talking about our ten plus years of Moodle experience, and the different activities and their uses in relation to the electronic management of assessment. It was interesting to reflect on how far we have come with our Moodle journey (being one of the early adopters in UK HE) and where other institutions are at.
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After another efficient lunch (see my previous post), it was on to the next session, which was around relationships and working with lots of groups across an institution in order to drive projects forward with informed decision making.
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The theme of IT Services as a trusted partner came up quite a lot, and it seems to be a key area for institutions who want to deliver projects with stakeholders from around the institution.
There was another session around privacy and ethics in relation to learning analytics, and this is going to be a big topic in 2019. There’s lots of data that we might already hold, or be able to collect, on our students, but should we use this data, and how do we form a partnership with the student voice in order to explore a way forward?
The conference continues tomorrow, but the exhibition hall closed this evening, so it will be rather odd to go back tomorrow with an enormous part of the overall experience missing. The queues for the UPS Store (inside the convention centre itself) were enormous as we were leaving this evening. Everyone is clearly keen to get their exhibition equipment packed up and shipped out as soon as possible!
This first appeared on the East Midlands Learning Technologists’ Group blog.
Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Learning from US institutions at Educause

Richard Goodman
Learning Technology Team Manager
Loughborough University

Educause 2018 – Day One

If you haven’t been following my series of posts, then I’ll just mention that I was one of the very lucky recipients of the UCISA bursary scheme, which has allowed me to be in Denver for the 2018 Educause conference.
Wednesday, Day One, is the big day, when Educause 2018 opens to everyone. My day started at 7:30am with the first in a series of “braindates”. This is a new concept for the conference this year, very simple but very effective (in my opinion). The idea behind a brain date is two-fold. Firstly, you can search through the “market” of existing brain dates, where conference attendees post topics that they are knowledgeable about, or topics that they want to find out more about. Secondly, you can add your own topics, and offer yourself up for brain dates. This was my approach, and I had offered myself up to talk about lecture capture and Moodle use.
So this morning, at a rather unfamiliar hour (I’ve usually just got out of the shower at 7:30am), I found myself in a little corrugated cardboard booth with someone from Arkansas State University, talking about lecture capture, and my experiences of our summer 2017 project to migrate to a new lecture capture system, roll it out across all pool teaching rooms on campus, and then introduce a new “opt out” lecture capture policy. All in three months. If you can avoid doing all of those things at once, you’ll probably have less grey hair than I do.
We had a really good chat, and it was interesting to learn about the receptiveness of the staff from Arkansas State University, and their willingness to try this campus technology for themselves. Our half an hour was over in a flash, and it was off to the main “Bellco Theatre” for the opening keynote.
As you might be able to tell from the photo, this is no ordinary “large lecture theatre” that you might normally go to for an opening keynote at a UK based conference. You don’t normally have a venue with a capacity of 5,000 that has seen Bruce Springsteen, Diana Ross, Elton John, Neil Young and Tori Amos taking to the very same stage.
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Michele Norris was today’s opening speaker, talking about the Race Card project, and how six word snapshots can paint a vivid picture of American attitudes to, and experiences of, race at this fascinating moment in American history. A lot to think about!
After a first brief visit to the Exhibition Hall (we’re talking Birmingham NEC size as opposed to a few tables around the side of a dining room), it was time to get immersed into the full conference programme. Just 27 parallel sessions to choose from for the first part of the day. I went to a session on learning analytics dashboards, a hot topic here in the USA, to hear about the approaches from three US institutions, and how they are using analytics to help with student retention.
After another session, it was soon time for lunch. At 11:30am. It runs for 2 hours, but that’s far too early a start for me, even if I’ve already been awake for 5 1/2 hours. There’s plenty of time to meet and talk to new people and share stories, as well as exploring the vast exhibition hall. It will take several visits to get around every stand in a logical and methodical manner.
One other quick observation about lunch. Despite there being thousands and thousands of people here, the queue moved with alarming speed. They really know how to cope with mass catering and keep things organised and moving along.
After lunch it was time for more sessions, this time on student data and then accessibility. There’s definitely an emerging theme around retention coming through, and there’s lots of work being done around spotting students who might be at risk of dropping out of university or college here in the US.
The conference day finishes with a networking opportunity in the exhibition hall again, the chance to meet more exhibitors, and chat to those exhibiting posters in a dedicated area of the hall. Lots of interesting stories being shared in the poster session, from really technical stuff about SSL to innovating with an online information literacy course. Definitely something for everyone.
This first appeared on the East Midlands Learning Technologists’ Group blog.
Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Making the most of a UCISA bursary award at ALT 2018

Marieke Guy
Learning Technologist
Royal Agricultural University

Planning for ALT 2018

It’s only 12 days and 17 hours till ALT 2018 – ALT’s 25th annual conference and the biggest meet up of Learning Technologists this side of the Atlantic (possibly?)
I have been lucky enough to be funded to attend by the UCISA bursary scheme and I intend to make good use of my subsidized ticket.
There is so much on it’s hard to know where to start but in traditional festival fashion I have a list of potential topics and sessions, though who knows what will happen when I actually get there!
Student engagement – At the Royal Agricultural University (RAU) we really want to get better at asking the students what they think. This year we ran the Jisc digital student experience and it was both enlightening and a little scary. I’d like to hear more about how other institutions have been using their data so will be attending Rating their digital experience – what do our students really, really want?.   I might follow this up with What organisational variables support a positive student digital experience? – which also looks at the broader tracker data. The session on Students as partners in technology initiatives: How does the technology aspect affect partnerships, and how can we make the most of this? also looks interesting.
Staff  digital skills – We also need to improve our staff digital literacy so the session on Witchcraft to Wonder – My journey empowering staff with technology sounds like a definite.
Data – I’m a big data fan and it is an area we’d like to explore at RAU. The session on Getting to grips with Learner Dashboards: a research informed critical approach to understanding their potential will be useful as does the well-named session Honey I shrunk the data: small design steps towards a data-informed blended learning approach .  I might also attend the workshop session on Using learning analytics to inform evidence-based interventions on live courses. Hopefully we can get some dashboards up and running in the next year.
VR – Virtual Reality offers so much potential. I’m hoping the Creating VR: what we learned along the way session will give some good pointers on how to get started. There is also Virtual Learning Environments: Walking in the Park or Wandering in the Jungle?. Sounds appropriate for an agricultural university!
Multimedia – Video is where it’s at. If I get time I will take a look at OSCEs at the Oscars: how video assessment has stolen the show and I like the look of the workshop Capturing Imaginations: Why it’s important to consider alternative uses of (lecture) capture technologies .
Distance learning and course design – For the Catalyst project, we need to design four blended learning programmes from scratch so any ideas are useful. I might try OSCAR: A Structured Approach to Course Design. We also know that we will be using ePortfolios for a considerable chunk of the assessments and the talk on Eportfolios in placements: unlocking the potential through collaboration could prove useful.
I’ll also be catching the keynotes from the fantastic all-female line up: Dr Tressie McMillan Cottom, Dr Maren Deepwell and Amber Thomas.

I will be presenting a poster during the poster and talk session entitled From little acorns…growing a learning technology culture.  If you’d like to discuss what it’s like being part of a one-person team then please find me. As I explain in the brief the poster is “of interest to anyone who wants to hear about how ‘more with less’ is possible if you make the most of collaborations and outside help. There will be lots of useful tips and far too many agriculture analogies!” I’ll post up my poster as soon as it’s finished.
Of course, as we all know the networking opportunities are what really make a conference. The Awards Evening and Dinner at the Midland Hotel will be great and I’m looking forward to hearing who has been voted ALT Learning Technologist of the Year.
I’ll also be catching up with my fellow UCISA bursary winner Karl Luke (Business Change Officer from Cardiff University). Karl and I bumped into each other at the recent Panopto user group meet up in Birmingham. We’ll clink glasses on behalf of UCISA!
Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Learning analytics, MOOCs and the Examinations Factory

gillian
Gillian Fielding
Learning and Skills Development Manager
University of Salford

 

 

Reflections on the first day of the EUNIS conference

I have to say how delighted I am to be here, and thank you to UCISA for awarding me this bursary award.  I confess I had not heard of EUNIS prior to the award and have rapidly come to realise how much we have to learn from this organisation. .

Expect the unexpected

And what a start to the Congress! Gerry Pennell from Manchester University gave a fascinating presentation about how he managed the IT for the London Olympics. IT Directors wouldn’t be surprised by his content but for me as a Digital Skills Manager there was so much in it. Having said that, the key difference from HE, and maybe of interest to IT Directors, was the deadline. It could NOT slip. Also of interest was everyone’s motivation in taking those roles considering they knew that the role would end immediately after the event. Understanding what drove people helped.

Other lessons for our sector: “expect the unexpected”. Cyberattacks were expected and ‘easy’ to deal with, wobbly poles caused by screaming crowds were not. Keeping calm and addressing issues was essential. It was essential to resolve the wobbly pole issue so potential photo finishes in the 100m finals were discernible. Gerry pointed out that projects can be delivered on time and should not drag on. Staying focused on the ‘must haves’, not getting side-tracked with bells and whistles, were key factors.

In year, immediate use of learning analytics

Use of learner analytics to go beyond retaining students was covered by Cheryl Reynolds from Huddersfield University in her really thought-provoking presentation. Cheryl and Cath Ellis used data from Turnitin’s GradeCentre to alter the curriculum during the module to suit immediately evident needs. Examples included students not using subject specific literature, incorrect use of possessive apostrophes and having poor, or non-existent, introductions. Data from GradeCentre was immediately analysed to form part of the next lesson on whatever was needed to find those that were closely associated with success. The data was presented to the students, carefully, so they could learn and improve. Cheryl pointed out this needs to be done discreetly so as not to embarrass anyone or negatively impact the low achievers.

In his presentation entitled ‘Blowing Backwards into the Future of Higher Education’, Anders Norberg of UMEA University pointed out the need and some of the issues we need to address to change our thinking about teaching and learning. He illustrated this by saying we often use ‘transfer learning’ in education but outside education people learn by ‘experimental learning’, suggesting this is an unsustainable mismatch. Anders raised many thought-provoking points, including that we think of learning in rooms, and that defines how we approach content and timescales. We need to move away from this, from ‘courses’ to ‘learning expeditions’.

MOOCs

Many aspects of MOOCs were covered, practical and otherwise, in the presentations from Yves Epelboin and Juan Antonio Martínez Carrascal. The number of MOOCs are rapidly, very rapidly, increasing. The main player is the Spanish ‘Miriada’ who are big in the South American market, ‘FutureLearn’ is next, then the French ‘Universite Numerique’ and the German ‘iVersity’. Interestingly, iVeristy has said there is no (MOOC) business in HE, they are focusing on working with the private sector.

Student retention – no one knows how many get to the end, some are lurkers and some are not interested in the quizzes and assessment. There is no research on what people want out of MOOCs. Flipped learning and SPOCs had benefits for HE in that they allowed academics to start dipping their toes in the waters of what’s needed for MOOCs. The advice from both presentations for HE was to start getting into MOOCs.

Eunis has resources on MOOCs.

Prof Mark Stubbs’ presentation was on Manchester Metropolitan’s Eunis Elite Award-winning EQAL project to implement major system changes across the institution to easily enable students’ wishes for ‘engaging and well-organised courses’ and ‘inspirational tutors who know me’. The project saw the student information system, Moodle and timetabling all talk to each other and give students their timetables, amongst other things, on their mobile devices. The project included single course codes, five well-written learning outcomes with employability skills and provided academics with useful analytics, and took four years to complete. I’m not surprised it was award-winning.

Blackboard’s Dan Peters’ presentation on the opportunities that ‘selfies’ offer us, was another thought-provoking session. Dan gave a convincing case that selfies were evidence of students wanted to produce and that we should monopolise on that in education. Dan cited Stanford who had interestingly made lecture attendance optional after introducing the flipped classroom and problem-based learning approach. They found that attendance increased. They didn’t produce their own recording but used OERs.

Reasons for academics not to engage were discussed e.g. time, skill, however the arguments for were compelling: use of OERs; recordings don’t need to be BBC quality; students want short, engaging content.

Assessment and electronic assessments formed the final sessions of the day. Gill Ferrell pointed to the fabulous resources that JISC have produced to guide staff when considering or reviewing assessment.  Possibly the most important point in this session was that peer reviews have a high impact on learning, though we need to explain to students why they are doing peer assessments, especially as it is not what they expect of HE. Gill also flagged the new JISC mailing list.

Copenhagen University and the Swiss Federal Institute addressed one of the sector’s key strategic challenges (see UCISA’s Strategic challenges for IT Services publication) by sharing their interesting practice in on-line assessments. Both are undertaking large numbers of on-line assessments in Copenhagen in the ‘Examinations Factory’ – a dedicated building. Practical issues covered cheating but little new here, looking over shoulders was still the same as when I was at school and did my 11+ (a long gone UK test for 10/11 year olds). Randomised questions helped mitigate the possibility of cheating. The other issues they’d had were also not new to exam cheating e.g. bringing data/devices (USBs and mobiles etc) into the testing room, and were easily combatted with locked systems and mobile detectors.

The benefits were improved quality, learning outcomes and efficiency, as well as easier to read exam scripts, so well worth it. Average cost €21 per exam. Many different types of exams were held, the obvious multiple choice, also ‘written’ exams, task based ones including conducting an Information Literacy search. The only exam types that were not possible were hand sketched submissions and ones which included written formula.

A great but exhausting first day. In the land of the ‘summer light’ I shall be getting an early night to rest my challenged brain.

You can follow Gillian’s Tweets @g_fielding, or follow the conference hashtag #eunis14.