Tag Archives: devops

PPM and bimodal business transformation

Hina Taank
Programme and Projects Officer
Brunel University

Gartner Program and Portfolio Summit 2017 – Workshop

Hina Taank was funded to attend this event as a 2017 UCISA bursary winner

This blog post refers to my personal views and the learning that I experienced from attending the Program and Portfolio Summit 2017.

Track: The Changing Program & Portfolio Management Ecosystem: Building on Excellence
Bimodal Business Transformation: Connecting Agile to Lean Startup and Design Thinking by Bruce Robertson

I was looking forward to listening to the talk by Bruce, who kick-started the day by explaining the Bimodal practice:
‘Bimodal is the practice of managing two separate but coherent styles of work, one focused on predictability and the other on exploration.’1

In general, organisations are working on Agile and DevOps, however Bruce stated that this is not enough. The way forward is to have a new mind-set to incorporate design thinking and lean start-up by understanding people.

For design thinking, it is important to establish what the customer thinks and to enhance the customer journey. The practice of ethnography captures the customer view:

  • how the customer feels
  • how the customer thinks
  • what the customer does.

Establishing user experiences is a skill set. The process mapping helps the business to view what their employees experience and feel. Ideas and innovation are generated in this space.

Bruce explained the concept of integrating the design methods using Lean start-up to develop a minimum viable product by measuring, leaning and building. The build takes place in IT using the Agile method.

It was interesting to hear about the Bimodal Business Transformation and how this could be implemented.

I will be blogging on specific Summit sessions such as this one, but information on some of the other keynotes and events can be found here.

Reference 1:

Robertson, B (2017, p. 4), Gartner Program and Portfolio Management Summit 2017, Presentation: Bimodal Business Transformation: Connecting Agile to Lean Startup and Design Thinking, Gartner, 12-13 June 2017

Full details on the presentation contents or how to contact the analysts can be obtained from Gartner, Inc directly.

Disclaimer:

Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

Benefits of receiving a UCISA bursary

Giuseppe Sollazzo

 

 

 

Giuseppe Sollazzo
Senior Systems Analyst
St George’s, University of London

 

 

 

 

Last October I was lucky enough to be selected for a UCISA bursary to attend O’Reilly Velocity in Amsterdam. Velocity is one of the most important conferences for performances in IT Systems, which is my area of work at St George’s, University of London: I lead a team of systems analysts who take care of the ongoing maintenance and development of our infrastructure. I had wanted to attend the conference for quite a while, but was always prevented from doing so by the hefty funding required, something that my institution could not readily justify.

The format of Velocity is particularly well suited to a mixture of blue-sky thinking, practical learning, networking with other professionals. Each day ran from 8:30 till 18:30. Following this schedule for three days was intense, but extremely rewarding in terms of learning.

I have written blogs for UCISA day by day throughout the conference. You can read about the specific sessions I followed on each day at the following links: day one, day two and day three. In summary, I learned about a mixture of practical techniques and heard about experiences in a variety of sectors.

As I wrote in my first blog post ahead of the conference, a focus on performance and optimisation is important for academic IT services, and specifically for my institution: with our 300 servers and 30,000 accounts to take care of, this is not just an important consideration, but our major worry on a daily basis. Access to funding is becoming increasingly competitive, as is student and researcher recruitment; it is becoming our primary goal to provide systems that are effective, secure, scalable, fast, and at the same time manageable by constrained staff numbers.

I was interested in three types of sessions:

  • practical tutorials about established techniques and tools
  • storytelling from people who have applied techniques to certain specific situations
  • sessions about new learning about new systems, to see where the industry is heading to.

Velocity has been great to help me crystallise my strategy on how to make St George’s systems evolve. In the past four months, this has translated into taking action on a number of aspects of our infrastructure. The most important are the following:

  • leading the team to build upon our logging systems, in order to extract metrics and improve the ability to respond to incidents
  • increasing our dependability on our ticketing system, by measuring response times and starting a project to make the ongoing monitoring of this part of our weekly service reviews
  • launching an investigation into researchers’ needs in terms of data storage and high performance computing; this has so far resulted in an experimental HPC cluster, which we are testing in collaboration with genomics and statistical researchers who are interested in massively parallel computations where performances are vital to the timeliness of research results for publishing.

I’m very grateful to UCISA for the opportunity it has given me. The knowledge and experience I’ve gathered at Velocity have been invaluable not just for starting new projects and reviewing our current service offer, but most importantly in beginning to understand what our strategy to maintain performances should be to still be able, in five to ten years’ time, to provide excellent industry-standard services to our community.

Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme 2018.

Heading to Velocity

Giuseppe Sollazzo

 

 

 

 

Giuseppe Sollazzo
Senior Systems Analyst
St George’s, University of London

 

 

 

This blog is the first in a series about my participation in the O’Reilly Velocity Conference in Amsterdam, funded by a UCISA bursary.

My job is to lead a team of systems analysts who take care of the ongoing maintenance and development of our infrastructure. I have a genuine passion for my job; knowing we provide services that benefit future doctors and health professionals in training gives me a positive attitude. As I believe that expanding my horizons is vital in keeping my interest and skills alive, I also have a number of other activities outside of my 9-5 work, most notably as an Open Data activist. I have been a ministerial advisor for Cabinet Office on Openness and Transparency Policy for the past two years.

Until 2012, the academic IT community had a yearly meetup at dev8d, a Jisc-sponsored three day conference. This event gathered developers, systems administrators, devops, digital librarians and support staff in a feast of sessions about development, new services, maintenance of systems, performances, and the future-proofing of everything “digital” in academic environments. The resulting networking and experience swapping had a lasting effect on the quality of academic outcomes.

However, in the subsequent difficult financial climate, events like dev8d have become rare (with dev8d itself being cancelled). In a situation of budget cuts and increased pressure from students and staff, the IT community has had to find alternative ways to get that same level of training and thinking about the future that came from such events. In this context, receiving funding from UCISA in order to sponsor attendance to a conference that my institution could not otherwise afford was welcome news.

My choice of event is O’Reilly Velocity in Amsterdam at the end of October. Velocity is an important conference – it also happens in New York, Santa Clara and Beijing – and it provides forward-looking sessions about performance and optimisation in systems and web operations. The sessions are often very practical, providing attendees with clear, pragmatic, and effective ideas on how to improve services. Engineers, developers and technology leaders share the challenges their businesses are facing and provide insight on technologies, best practices, and solutions that they have successfully employed to address those challenges.

In the situation I have described, it is evident why a focus on performance and optimisation is important for academic IT services, and specifically for my institution: with our 300 servers and 30,000 accounts to take care of, this is an important consideration.

With access to funding becoming increasingly competitive, as is student and researcher recruitment, it becomes our primary goal to provide systems that are effective, secure, scalable, fast, and at the same time manageable by constrained staff numbers.

The sessions I plan to attend focus on a single goal; understanding how to improve services and ensure our users are satisfied and engaged with our systems. Some examples of sessions I intend to follow include:

I will be reporting from the conference floor both on Twitter (from my account @puntofisso) and this blog. Stay tuned!