Tag Archives: compliance

Compliance in multiple repositories

Sara Somerville

 

Sara Somerville
Information Solutions Manager
University of Glasgow

 

Feedback on a content management session at the AIIM conference

Content Whack-a-Mole: Keeping Up Compliance across Multiple Repositoriespresentation by Michyle LaPedis and Jordan Jones from Cisco Systems

There are multiple tools popping up that enable users to create, share and manage documents, and these were challenging the traditional repository set-up such that users didn’t know what tools to use when. The team realised they needed an overarching strategy to address this issue.

One of the other problems Cisco had was around the search tools which were returning a lot of ROT (Redundant, Obsolete and Trivial data), and if the users couldn’t find what they needed then they tended to create the document again.

Content Management IT at Cisco focuses on an open architecture with open source and open standards. They have three major on premise systems and are currently implementing a project to migrate documents in to one system/repository as a focus for records management, and to enable the application of lifecycle management to that content. (Cisco also use box as their organisational cloud based document management and collaboration tool.)

Some of the steps the team took to improve the situation included:

  • Rationalising their on and off premise services and adding a compliance layer
  • Creating a content management program management office to ensure that proposals for any new IT tools came through this office for approval
  • They defined an ILM (Information Lifecycle Management) strategy for their documents and identified their repositories
  • Cloud offerings often mean less control and make it harder to manage and delete content, but the team created a dashboard for users to move documents from the cloud (or any other location) in to the repository they had created
  • They sent out monthly emails with information about what records need to be deleted and then reminder emails were sent every month after that to remind users to take action (if the users don’t take action after six months then the data is deleted).

Some of the issues they have encountered:

  • New platforms do mean new issues
  • Changing personnel means sometimes starting over – but hopefully there is some hand-over
  • There is a code of conduct which states that it is an employee’s responsibility to manage their information responsibly
  • They have started to phase out the network file shares by making them read-only and then they will start to move the documents over to the other approved repositories.

Key takeaways:

How do you win the game (Whack-a-Mole)?

  • Remember the game will never end
  • It’s important to have a strategy and for records and information professionals to work with IT to implement it
  • There is always going to be a new technology, so it’s important to get the process and the people part working together.

 

 

Looking to the future: sustainable IT and HE web presence

simon

Simon Geller
Senior Project Manager
University of Sheffield
Member of UCISA-PCMG

Day Two at Educause

I started the day at 8am – the Yanks get up early! – with a session on Google Apps. Sheffield was an early adopter of Google so I had an in on this but the session got a bit bogged down in questions about account creation and deletion rather than the potential for collaboration.

Sustainable IT
Then I moved on to a discussion session about sustainable IT. This doesn’t get talked about so much these days – I think one of the reasons for this is that the movement into cloud services means that institutions aren’t quite so conscious of their energy footprint. Also, IT shouldn’t beat itself up too much about how green it is – we enable so much green activity in other areas, from maps and journey planners on smartphones that make people feel more comfortable about walking and using public transport rather than driving, pool bike schemes that you register for online, to smart energy management systems and systems that make industrial processes much more efficient. The future is Green IT that you don’t even notice.

A presentation from the University of Edinburgh on helping non-project managers to deliver success
In the afternoon, I thought I’d better support our Edinburgh colleagues and went to their presentation  on how they provide support for non-vocational project managers. Although the AV wasn’t being helpful the level of resource they had brought to the issue was impressive.

Then I continued on my quest to discover where the web would take us in the next 10 years. The key message from What Will Your .Edu Site Look Like in 10 Years?  is that your web presence will be going out and looking for your customers rather than waiting for them to come to you.

Later I found myself in a compliance session I hadn’t really intended to go, but thought I’d take risk and stick with it. The message I took away from that is that there are two types of institutions – those that have been hacked, and those that had been hacked and don’t know about it. Scary!

The final session I attended that day was a trend analysis run by journalists from the Chronicle of Higher Education , and the takeaway from that was that we used to talk about the for-profit sector, now, in the US at least, the whole area is for-profit. Plus two questions to ask suppliers: “What research is (that assertion) based on? and “What’s the upgrade cycle?” – cutting edge tech doesn’t stay there for long.