Tag Archives: code

Improving focus and productivity with GitKraken and GloBoard

Annet Soos
Senior Web Developer
City, University of London

 

 

Discovering new software development tools at DeveloperWeek 2018, New York

Web development is a constantly evolving discipline. Keeping up to date with current trends and technologies is mandatory and with the help of the UCISA bursary programme, I was able to attend the DeveloperWeek Conference in Brooklyn, New York City. This conference included an expo, a hackathon for seven different challenges, five stages, and company representatives from Silicon Valley, and Japan. I also met developers from around the world, learnt agile team management techniques from people on C-board level, and discovered the latest tools available to improve my own personal and team’s development.
Attending this two-day event has been hugely beneficial for me and I’ve so far shared my new-found knowledge with colleagues and the developer community in London. For example: there are two tools that I came across, which I found exceptionally useful: GitKraken for version control and GloBoard for collaboration. I have integrated them into my team’s workload at City, University of London and noticed the improvement in my team’s focus and productivity.

Why version control?

When multiple developers are working on the same codebase, code-conflicts can happen, bugs can be introduced, wrong files may be accidentally deleted. Version control can help teams to retrieve earlier versions of their working source code.
By using Git as your distributed version control system, you can cover the following areas:
  • Collaboration by allowing developers to work on multiple versions of the same codebase simultaneously
  • Reviewable and restorable previous versions of the same code
  • Test alternative features before production release
  • Back up your code to a remote server.
There are several platforms to make Git work with a web interface and amongst them Github is the web community’s favourite. In 2018, it has 28 million users and 56 million repositories. Github also offers you free public repository hosting, access management, editing tools, issue tracking and more.

What does GitKraken offer?

GitKraken by Axosoft is a Git-client software that has a fun look and its intuitive user interface helps developers and non-developers equally, to understand what is happening with the source code.
As Bruce Bullis, Senior Engineering Manager of Adobe Pro Video Integration, states “software with a personality, makes you want to use it”.
The Web team at City, University of London have started to use GitKraken and have noticed the positive results. Personally, this new tool has helped me to track progress of different feature branches and it saves me time by allowing me to resume back to earlier versions, without looking for abstract commit numbers. It also makes on-boarding quicker, as I have noticed with new developers, who do not know how to use the command line, can start contributing to the codebase straight away and allows them to concentrate on the important work at hand.

Improving collaboration with GloBoard

Axosoft has another product called GloBoard. It is the extension of Gitkraken and it introduces source code workflow by allowing Git-issue synchronisation with their Git-client. My team started to use GloBoard as a scrum board, where we organise our backlog cards into designated columns. It is very similar to how Trello cards work. The benefit of using one integrated system, is that it reduces time loss and there is no context change. Once you make a Git-commit and finish a task, you can move the designated card from the progress queue to a finished status instantly, without logging into a different system.

At the time of the conference this software was not fully developed, and it was very exciting to talk about the product with Axosoft’s founder, Hamid Shojaee.

What is next

CodeStream team at DevelopWeek, NYC 2018

There were lots of other great ideas, for example:
  • code chat and documentation from CodeStream;
  • developer recruitment applications from Codility.
These tools are still in the testing phase in our team but hopefully in the near future, they will make our team’s life easier. We are continuously looking to test and innovate our workflow.
Being on this conference has allowed me to talk to entrepreneurs like Hamid, who are creating these innovative tools. Giving early feedback on beta versions of products makes me feel part of the development project. It was truly a fantastic experience to be part of it.
Interested in applying for a UCISA bursary? Then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

SharePoint migration from MySites to OneDrive for Business

Tristian O’Brien
SharePoint Technical Specialist
University of Brighton

Blog entry syndicated from my other blog that runs on GHOST.

I maintain a set of PowerShell scripts and processes to migrate many MySites from SharePoint 2010 to OneDrive for business.

As we know, PowerShell can automate many processes that you could perform using the user interfaces of SharePoint on premise or in the cloud.

So the general idea is to:

  • use a mapping file, where we have at least two columns. Column A in the windows on-premise username. Column B is the Office 365 (O365) login. I do have a third column, which is the destination OneDrive, but since this is almost usually the OneDrive logon, where any ‘@’ or ‘.’ are escaped as ‘_’
  • populate this file or database table with the users that you want to migrate
  • using PowerShell iterate through this list and
  • set users on-premise MySite to read only – I upload a separate master page and change the page status for this
  • in O365, assume the user is setup, licensed and provisioned. We use an account that has global admin rights in O365.
  • in O365, make sure that the global admin has access to the users OneDrive by adding it as a secondary admin
  • use ShareGate PowerShell to migrate the data. I know this is a cheat, but there are many reasons to use ShareGate such as insane mode, using Azure Storage and logging. Here are some other thoughts on Azure Storage.
  • when content has migrated successfully, timestamp the user profile on-premise with a date migrated value – later on we deploy some timer jobs to with delete or recycle after a specified time period.

Take a sneak peek at the https://github.com/devacuk/UoBMigration.  This is some code that I prepared for the dev.ac.uk event co-hosted by UCISA and JISC in February 2018. Slides are available here.  Much of the knowledge I accrued in order to do this are as a result of being awarded a UCISA bursary that paid the costs of travel, conference entrance fee and accommodation to MicroSoft IGNITE 2017.  For blogs on Microsoft Ignite, click here

I strongly suggest that if you do work in IT for a UK Higher Education institution, that you apply for the bursary yourself. Where this particularly helped is that I attended sessions about the latest developments in PowerShell, the tooling and Office 365. I found it particularly valuable to meets engineers from Microsoft Azure, ShareGate, MetaLogix and other vendors of migration products.

The only downside is that it is a corporate event, so one particular query about how and when any throttling of content into and out of Office 365 may occur, didn’t really get any answers from Microsoft, as I guess this kind of detail is a trade secret, I get that.

ShareGate offered some good advice on their experience with organisations way bigger than my institution, in that if you use their tools to manually migrate, use different tabs for different migration tasks. If using it in its PowerShell guise, then split the job up. Although managing that particular task would be a challenge in terms of organisation. I guess you could containerise the server using say Docker but ShareGate licenses would be needed for those individual containers I guess.

Another aspect of IGNITE is the sheer scale if it. I had planned to attend various sessions, but this wasn’t always possible due to sessions being placed far apart, overcrowding at some times and the warm weather. If I went again, I would be prepared for that though.

This blog post also appears on http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/tristianobrien/

Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

UCISA welcomes blog contributions and comment responses to blog posts from all members. If you would like to contribute a new perspective or opinion on a current topic of interest, simply contact UCISA’s marketing manager Manjit Ghattaura via manjit.ghattaura@it.ox.ac.uk

 

The views expressed on UCISA blogs are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect those of UCISA