Monthly Archives: May 2016

Information management

Sara Somerville

 

 

Sara Somerville
Information Solutions Manager
University of Glasgow

Notes from the AIIM conference

Information Management…The Technology Doesn’t Matter presentation by Russ Stalters

  • Limit your choices for document types and categories.
  • Policies (and best practices) should reinforce the information management practices and keep them short – one or two pages – and train people on the policy with annual refreshers.
  • Make sure each department helps to define their information management procedures; this helps with a sense of ownership.
  • Create an information governance council with members from senior management.
  • Business leaders need to own these decisions – have contacts in each business area who knows the data.
  • Establish quarterly business stakeholder briefings.
  • Use a consistent model for implementation in each area. Think about your lessons learned and refine as you go.
  • Highly recommend an information management operations team – create a team to manage the implementation – this could be a champions network who have been trained, and make sure they are recognised by their peers.
  • Make sure the data owners are assigned from the business.
  • Pay attention to the people side of change – use an established methodology e.g. ADKAR:

Awareness of the need for change

Desire to support the change

Knowledge of how to change

Ability to demonstrate new skills and behaviours

Re-enforcement to make the change stick

  • Try to make it fun and introduce games.
  • Use innovative communication tools e.g. information management coaster (they used a company called xplane – http://www.xplane.com/).

Key takeaway: It doesn’t matter which technology you pick – focus on the other elements that can guarantee your success.

 

Information Management is Hard – Guess What? Your Customers Don’t Care presentation by Ed McQuiston of OnBase (Hyland)

The consumerisation of IT, the Nexus of Forces, the SMAC stack (Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud Services) – whatever you call it, the industry of information management is at a crossroads.

What are your expectations from your healthcare provider? Do you expect to fill in multiple paper forms asking for the same information? What is your expectation of the service you would get from your insurance company?

The information you need to do the job is the same as it was ten years ago, but the information needs to be digital and it needs to be accessible and useable. However, there has been an information explosion (we are trying to manage these volumes of data in real time) and the users have different expectations around how they can work with that information.

In 2007 when the iPhone was introduced it completely shifted our expectations around how and where we want to consume content. The expectation of the millennials is to be able to access both structured and unstructured data instantly.

What does this mean?

  • You need to be Agile to get your products to the market place quickly.
  • The problem is that you have a vast amount of silos and a mixture of custom code and third party apps.
  • You need to think about capturing all the different types of content in one repository and make that content available on-line, off-line and mobile, with external partners if required – the consumer of the information isn’t just internal any more. However, your users don’t want to have to log in to a different system every time, they want to live in their line of business system.
  • You need to be able to have real time data exchange across systems – if someone has put the data into a repository it needs to be immediately available in other systems.
  • You need to start thinking about your repository as the middleware – an integration hub or information management platform – a platform is more than a brand (should be designed in a very different way from a data warehouse).

 

 

 

 

Putting a STAMP on your digital shadow

Sara Somerville

 

 

Sara Somerville
Information Solutions Manager
University of Glasgow

Day three of the AIIM conference

Erik Qualman delivered the keynote, Modern Leadership: The Five Habits to Success and Happiness, setting the scene by highlighting some new online services, and getting us thinking about what could be around the corner. He said we should accept that privacy is dead. You might think, “I’ll get off the grid,” but that’s the worst thing you can do – take control of your online presence instead. Your digital shadow is important, as that’s what people say about you. (A digital shadow is your digital footprint, or what you leave behind when you have interacted with the internet. This can be passively, where data is collected about you; or actively, where you share information about yourself by means of websites or social media.)

Digital_Shadows_Blog_4_Image_1

Some interesting facts and trends relevant to online data collection include:

  • The startling statistic, provided by Erik, that 25% of children in the US who haven’t been born yet already have a digital stamp/footprint
  • Mobile voting – it’s coming
  • edX, founded by Harvard University and MIT in 2012, is a MOOC provider that publishes teaching materials and high-quality courses online for free
  • Spritz is a tool that varies the speed of text so you can teach yourself to speed read; you can incorporate it in to your e-reader
  • Oculus opens up possible uses for virtual reality – you can already get a $20 version from Google
  • Clicks to Bricks This term refers to a company’s integration of both online (clicks) and offline (bricks) presence and understanding the connections between its online presence and its face-to-face relationship with its customers
  • Wearable technology e.g. Fitbit .

STAMP – Five key elements

STAMP_Blog_4_Image_3Digital leaders are made, not born. Erik encouraged us to incorporate or take away one thing from the following that we thought we could use in our day-to-day. Think about these five elements, or STAMP:

Simple – Simplification? It’s hard to do in the digital age. We try to multi-task but this makes us less efficient – when we do that our IQ drops by 15 points, or the equivalent of not sleeping for 36 hours! An amusing example of simplification is a viral video from the Dollar Shave Club. They have a simple idea that is very well executed.

True – It’s important to have a ‘not for now’ list; leaders know where they want to go. What do you want your digital stamp to look like – for yourself, and for your company?

Act – Action and attitude trump everything.

  • We get into throughput traps – have we actually produced anything? Focus on the output.
  • Type into your phone the two things you want to achieve during the day, and try to achieve them (often you don’t get them done as you start fire-fighting and focusing on the immediate).
  • Silicon Valley has worked out that it’s ok to fail, but fail fast, fail forward, fail better (this is a key element of the Agile methodology).
  • Coolest cooler, the second most successful Kickstarter project ever, failed the first time to raise enough money. However, the second time around, they launched in the summer instead of the winter, and raised enough to fund their project.
  • It’s about being flawsome! When you make a mistake, how are you going to be flawsome? How are you going to deal with it? That is what sets you apart.

Map – You don’t use an old map to get to new destinations – pioneers will get pushback.

People – We thrive on people. Social media isn’t about technology, it’s about relationships and people. Pushback_Blog_4_Image_5

  • Try to spend five minutes getting interested in someone on social media, rather than trying to get them interested in you.
  • Post it forward e.g. list three people whom you admire and mention it; endorse people for skills on LinkedIn.
  • Network before you need your network e.g. don’t connect with someone on LinkedIn and then send them a message the next day asking them about a job opportunity.
  • Make sure you work on-line and off-line. Modern leaders do this – mix your virtual with your face-to-face – the tools should work for you, not the other way around.
  • Two things drive a great organisation – great people on the team and word of mouth.

Key takeaways:

  • The tools should work for you, not the other way around.
  • Produce a great digital STAMP – what will your grandchildren see? Will they see that you pursued your dream, or settled for something in between?

 

The future of work

Sara Somerville

 

 

Sara Somerville
Information Solutions Manager
University of Glasgow

 

Day two of the AIIM Conference

In The Future of Work Jacob Morgan talked about why the future of work is about the employee experience.

In his presentation he cited the Future of Work community, a group of CEOs who collaborate to share their experiences of building a workforce for the future.

Jacob argued that experience starts with an event, which gives an experience, producing a feeling and leaving a memory. If we have a bad experience, that’s what we remember. How did it make us feel? Let’s think about what that is like in the workplace.

Work used to be all about utility, and processes were designed to be done by robots and software. Now the technology has finally caught up, and we are replacing the robots, not the other way around.

In the last 150 years we have built our workplaces based on the notion that work is drudgery, and we are just a cog in a wheel.

Cogs_Blog_3_Image_1

Jacob reminded us that we now have different ways of earning money such as Uber, Airbnb, and Etsy, so we don’t always need to go to a traditional workplace. Therefore, we need to create a different work environment, and think about the experience.

Why bother? Organisations that are rated as great places to work are consistently out-performing other organisations.

There are five trends shaping the future of work:

  • New behaviours, including social tools – we are much more comfortable leading a more public life. How can we bring these behaviours in to the workplace? We live in 2016, but we work in 1975!
  • Technologies – wearable devices, collaborative technologies
  • The Millenial workforce – there are new attitudes, expectations, and ways of working but this doesn’t mean the forward-thinking employee has to be young; they can be any age
  • Mobility – work anytime, anywhere, and on any device
  • Globalisation – no boundaries.

5_Trends_Blog_3_Image_2

Employee Experience

Jacob considered that there are three key parts to our experience as employees:

  • Physical environment – Is it a creative space? Does the space energise the employees? Is it dark and uncared for? Are your organisation’s values reflected in your environment?
  • Cultural environment – How does it feel? Is it impacted by organisational structure? Do employees feel a sense of purpose? Worth? Are they treated fairly?
  • Technological environment – This comprises devices, applications, software, user experience and design. If your organisation doesn’t give you the tools you need to do your job, this causes a bad experience. Is your technology consumer grade or enterprise standard? Is it available to everybody? Is it focused on employee needs or business requirements? We need to understand how people actually work, rather than ticking off a checklist of features.

Great examples of forward-thinking office spaces are Airbnb, Cisco, and Whirlpool (who use Google products to manage their enterprise data, as this is what the employees use outside the workplace).

Organisations need to provide a great employee experience to attract and retain talented and innovative employees.

There has to be a balance between employee freedom and organisational control, and you can create that via transparency.

Key takeaway: A lot of workplaces have been based on factory environments, but you need to think of your organisation as a kind of laboratory.

Digital transformation – dare to dream!

Sara Somerville

 

 

Sara Somerville
Information Solutions Manager
University of Glasgow

 

Day 1 of the AIIM 2016 conference

The introductory workshop with Thornton May provided discussion points for a smaller group of attendees, to get us thinking about what transformation really meant.

Thornton believes transformation has three elements:

  • Trends
  • Wild cards
  • Dreams

Many executives are ‘gee whiz nexties’ and spend a lot of time thinking about the next new shiny bright piece of technology; but where are the dreams and innovations? We are living in an information environment, so basically, information professionals should rule!

The opening keynote from the president of AIIM, John Mancini,  reflected on the twenty years John has been with AIIM. Technology and the information landscape have changed immeasurably since 1996. Back then, the iPhone was still eleven years away; there was no Google, no Twitter, no Wikipedia. And these changes are just a shadow of the change that is to come, and John advised that  we need to exercise humility when we consider the future and what it might hold for technology.

There are three main disrupters accelerating at a pace that could not have been predicted:

However, what distinguishes organisations in an information age is the difference in mindset between those which function in the mainstream and those which function on the edge.

If you compare the two with regard to the following themes, you can see how this manifests:

  • Mindsets – those on the edge will do things themselves, where those in the mainstream will contact IT
  • Messages – on the edge organisations are using Slack whilst mainstream organisations use SharePoint; and those on the edge emphasize innovation whilst the mainstream aims for efficiency
  • Money (where it’s being spent) – on the edge, in the last five to ten years, the big IT players have created wealth equivalent to the GDP of Korea!
  • Machines (what technology is being used) – on the edge they use the Cloud whilst mainstream use servers on premise; on the edge it’s mobile, versus PC for the mainstream; those on the edge configure and connect, while the mainstream build and develop.

The problems created by all this radical disruption can be broadly split in to three areas: automation, security and governance, and insight. Information professionals can make a real difference in all three of these areas:

  • Automation – information professionals can help to identify and automate business processes
  • Security and governance – they can help organisations secure and manage information
  • Insight – they can obtain value from big data and analytics.

AIIM has always believed that information management is about people, process and technology – the technology might change in the future, but the people and process will remain constant.

People_process_tech_blog_2_image1People_process_tech_blog_2_image2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, who now owns the big picture? Who provides the ‘adult supervision’ for all of this? Who acts as the bridge between people, process and technology?  According to John, the information professional should be the glue – now is not the time to stick your head in the sand; now is the time to ‘own this’!

Key takeaway:  We are entering an information renaissance and each and every one of us is a Michelangelo!

Looking beyond the present

The opening keynote was followed by a panel discussion entitled Industry Insights 2020 Expert Panel: Consumerization + Simplification = Digital Transformation, chaired by futurist Thornton May with Andrea Chiappe, David Calderia, Hugo Palacios, and Stephen Ludlow.

The panelists discussed questions around what organisations are concerned with when they talk about digital transformation. It was agreed that it’s not just about taking the paper out of a process, but about using a whole new approach, and thinking about changing your business model. Information professionals should think about what they are not seeing at the moment (e.g. people using Slack). We should also be aware of self-selecting by taking the traditional technological approach.

For a lot of companies the worry is that their competitors will be the ones to smash through and use the latest technologies, leaving them behind. Where is the big spending? In Business Intelligence (BI), and in determining the best use of analytics. However, it’s no good having secure information if it isn’t available at the right time.

Key takeaway: There is a new world that requires a completely new approach and new ways of thinking.

Pan-European implementation

We then broke for the last sessions, and I attended the session entitled Implementing Automated Retention at the European Central Bank with Beatriz Garcia Garrido and Maria Luisa Di Biagio.

The bank uses the Open Text system, which they began implementing in 2007. There are now eighteen thousand users (not only ECB but counterparts across Europe) and eight million documents.

Why implement retention?

  • to keep only what is needed
  • for historical reasons
  • to comply with legislation

The bank ran a pilot to validate the approach, and to test the processes of managing the information. The pilot highlighted that it was complex to build a retention schedule and apply it to the right information at the right level ; so, they took a step back and focused on the final goal of applying retention in the simplest way. They created a task force made up of records managers, archivists, and some Open Text consultants. The task force re-examined the retention schedules and looked at how difficult it was to apply them in an electronic world (the schedules were originally designed for paper records, which made them very difficult to apply).

The schedules were analysed and simplified, rolling up some of the timescales (e.g. one year/five years/ten years/permanent), and adding information about each record series in order to define event-based or time-based triggers only. The system was also tweaked to make it simpler.

During the implementation phase the retention policies were applied at the folder levels, and deletion reports were sent to the business users for approval. Documents were automatically declared as records two years after their creation (if they hadn’t been manually declared as records).

There is a mixture of user-driven and automated retention application. Time-based retention is applied at document level and event based retention is applied at folder level.

Roles and responsibilities : project board; project manager – for each business area there is an implementation team that includes a business user as well as a records manager and an archivist. (Implemented over Jan 2015-Dec 2016.)

As you can see from the slide below, implementation has planned phases.

Implementation_blog_2_image3

The communication channels for the project include the executive board, senior management, the users, and the information management forum for each area.

For the full implementation phase, the team plans to replace sent deletion reports to the business areas with a yearly review of the retention periods within those areas. Future challenges include the preservation of records with long term retention (this is being scoped as a separate project), and other content not in the Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS), e.g. emails.

Key takeaway: The integration of policy, systems, and processes is essential.