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Interviews: How AV developments in Melbourne’s universities are helping students

Ben Sleeman
Service Development Assistant
University of Greenwich

AETM Conference 2017 and university visits, Melbourne, Australia

Prior to attending the Audiovisual and Education Technology Management (AETM) Conference (AETM conference) at the University of the Sunshine Coast, courtesy of a UCISA bursary, I spent a week visiting five universities in Melbourne.  At each of the universities, I was taken on a tour of their teaching and learning spaces by the audio visual teams, and then interviewed a member of the team at each university to talk about what I had seen.

I have already shared interviews with Jeremy West, Senior Audio Visual Engineer and Tech Lead in the eSolution Team at Deakin University, where we discussed the range of AV technologies at Deakin and these can be seen in my previous blog posts. One of the particular areas we discussed related to the support of hearing impaired users in teaching and learning spaces – this was also an area that I discussed with other university AV teams when touring their facilities.

Monash University

The first university I visited was Monash University where I met Matt Crawford, Audio Visual Operations and Service Delivery Manager in the eSolutions Team. Matt showed me around the teaching and learning spaces and answered some questions about what I saw on the tour.

We also talked about the current hearing-impaired AV solutions at Monash University and about new technologies and the legal requirements in Australian buildings to acquire a certificate of occupancy. Currently, Monash have various technologies, such as hearing loops and infra-red (IR), in place due to the age of their buildings but they are aiming to move to a consolidated solution.

University of Melbourne

The second tour of teaching and learning spaces took place at The University of Melbourne. Here Carlo Sgro, Senior Technical Specialist in Audio Visual Service and Strategy Infrastructure Services, gave me a tour and discussed the university’s AV solutions.

When talking about hearing impaired AV solutions, Carlo said that a high proportion of the systems are hearing loops; they have tried to stay away from infra-red and radio frequency (RF) solutions so are currently investigating wifi solutions as an alternative.

RMIT

The third university visit was with RMIT. I was taken around RMIT’s teaching and learning spaces by Adam Attana, Team Lead, AV Design, Technology – Learning, Teaching and Research, and Nikesh Kapadia, AV Delivery Manager, Information Technology Services.  After the tour I interviewed Nikesh, who explained how the flat floor teaching spaces have the IR systems in place while the lecture theatres have induction loops. With the IR systems, the receivers are managed by the student facing RMIT connect department, which allows the receivers to be lent out to students with hearing impairments.


 

 

Swinburne University

My fourth visit was to Swinburne University where I met with Robert Cameron, Technical Manager – Audio-Visual, Infrastructure Group, Information Technology. Most of the hearing-impaired solutions at Swinburne have historically been induction loops but they have recently moved to IR solutions.



Interested in finding out more about a UCISA bursary, then visit UCISA Bursary Scheme.

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